O’Rourke, Brown shake up volatile Democratic horse race

The midterm elections have shaken up the early race for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination. 

Enthusiasm for a White House bid by Rep. Beto O’Rourke is soaring after he came within 3 percentage points of Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzDems attracted to O'Rourke because he demonstrates civility, says political analyst Gillum to speak at gathering of top Dem donors: report O'Rourke edges out Biden in MoveOn straw poll MORE in the Texas Senate race. 

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O’Rourke, seen as more of a dark-horse candidate in 2020 just a few weeks ago, is suddenly being embraced by former aides to President Obama, who are comparing him to their former boss. And he’s not ruling out a White House run after dismissing it as a Senate candidate. 

The Texan isn’t not the only potential candidate with new momentum after the midterms, either. 

Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownGOP rep: If Mueller had found collusion, ‘investigation would have wrapped up very quickly’ O’Rourke is fireball, but not all Dems are sold Deval Patrick announces he will not run for president in 2020, citing 'cruelty of election process' MORE, fresh off a decisive reelection victory in Ohio, is openly considering a run for the White House. 

Democrats are giving him a fresh look, too, given his win in a perpetual swing state where President TrumpDonald John TrumpHouse Republicans move to block Yemen war-powers votes for rest of Congress Trump says he's considering 10 to 12 contenders for chief of staff Michael Flynn asks judge to spare him from jail time MORE handily defeated Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonRoger Stone challenges Dems to produce WikiLeaks evidence Steve King asks Google CEO for names of employees to see if they're liberals O'Rourke edges out Biden in MoveOn straw poll MORE in 2016. 

Democrats focused on winning back working-class voters are wondering if Brown’s brand of populism and socially liberal politics would make him a credible national candidate. 

“Beto’s campaign has certainly catapulted him into the conversation,” said Adam Hodge, a Democratic strategist and former Democratic National Committee official. Likewise, he added, “Brown is getting a first look. Like Beto, he ran an authentic campaign that spoke directly to voters and did it in a battleground states that Democrats shouldn’t give up.”  

The new momentum for O’Rourke and Brown will create fresh challenges for other would-be contenders who have long been seen as likely 2020 Democratic candidates. 

The field of challengers to Trump is expected to be large, and Democrats will be looking for lanes to distinguish themselves in the crowded contest. 

That includes former Vice President Joe BidenJoseph (Joe) Robinette BidenUniversity of Delaware renames public policy school after Joe Biden Dems attracted to O'Rourke because he demonstrates civility, says political analyst The case for reauthorizing VAWA MORE and Sens. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersCoal supporter Manchin named top Dem on Senate Energy Committee Gillum to speak at gathering of top Dem donors: report O'Rourke edges out Biden in MoveOn straw poll MORE (I-Vt.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenGillum to speak at gathering of top Dem donors: report O'Rourke edges out Biden in MoveOn straw poll Dems ask if Trump aide Bill Shine is breaking ethics laws MORE (D-Mass.), who have long been seen as top contenders in part because of their name recognition. 

“The race has kind of flipped on its head in a really short time,” said one Democratic donor. “All of a sudden, it looks like the front-runners aren’t really the front-runners anymore.”

Democrats have long seen Biden as a strong general election candidate but have questioned his ability to win a primary against more liberal Democrats. 

He would face real competition from Brown, who is to Biden’s left on trade, but also from Sen. Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyWould-be 2020 Dem candidates head for the exits O’Rourke, Brown shake up volatile Democratic horse race The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by T-Mobile — Democratic race for Speaker turns nasty MORE (D-Pa.), who like the senator from Ohio won reelection convincingly in a state won by Trump in 2016. 

Biden, who hails from Scranton, Pa., has long been considered a candidate who could appeal to blue-collar white voters. But that is also the demographic that Brown or Casey could shoot for. 

The former vice president might also have to compete with O’Rourke for the Obama crowd, judging from the effusive remarks about the Texan made by the ex-president’s former aides. 

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is also seriously considering a White House bid as a Democrat, fresh off an election cycle in which he poured cash into races to help Democrats win back the House. 

Bloomberg, who would run as a centrist, could be a threat to Biden in that lane of a primary. 

O’Rourke and Brown could also suck up the oxygen that other candidates need, including Sens. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisO'Rourke edges out Biden in MoveOn straw poll Kamala Harris to keep seat on Judiciary Committee California dreamin’ in the 2020 presidential race MORE (D-Calif.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerGillum to speak at gathering of top Dem donors: report Dem: 'Disheartening' that Republicans who 'stepped up' to defend Mueller are leaving McConnell agrees to vote on Trump-backed criminal justice bill MORE (N.J.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandPavlich: The media gets woke on the Women’s March Warren has contacted 100 people in early 2020 primary states: report O’Rourke is fireball, but not all Dems are sold MORE (N.Y.). 

Strategists say candidates will have to figure out how quickly to launch campaigns to try to get attention from donors and the public.

They say established candidates might want to jump in quickly to blunt the momentum of a Brown or O’Rourke, for fear they could rev up like Obama’s campaign in 2008. 

“[The Clinton campaign] gave him an opening and he ran through it,” said Democratic strategist Chris Kofinis. “If I’m more of an established kind of candidate, if I’m a Biden or a Warren, you can’t wait. You’ve got to be out there really fast with a strong message.  

“The advantage someone like Beto has is that he has nothing to lose,” Kofinis added. “That is a dangerous candidate in a multi-candidate field. Same as Obama. Look at the kind of campaign he ran. He had nothing to lose.”

There are signs that some of the politicians long seen as 2020 candidates are getting into the deeper water. 

Warren this week rolled out a foreign policy vision focused on free trade agreements. Speaking at American University, she said foreign policy should “benefit all Americans, not just wealthy elites.” 

Other candidates are on the move to early primary states. Booker is heading back to New Hampshire to headline a “post-election victory celebration,” the state party announced on Friday. 

Harris crisscrossed Iowa last month and proposed a tax credit of up to $500 a month for families earning less than $100,000. 

Every day, the potential field grows seemingly larger. 

Last week, former Secretary of State John KerryJohn Forbes KerrySantorum: Dems have a chance in 2020 if they pick someone ‘unexpected’ Major Obama 2008 fundraiser throws support behind Beto 2020: ‘Time to pass the torch’ Would-be 2020 Dem candidates head for the exits MORE, the Democratic nominee in 2004, said he was mulling a run in 2020. 

“Everyone is deciding they have an opening based on their own facts,” said Kofinis. 

The elbows may begin to fly. 

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel (D) on Thursday said it would be unusual for the party to nominate O’Rourke in 2020 since you usually don’t nominate losers — a pointed reference to the loss to Cruz.