Boston Globe pans Warren as ‘divisive figure’ ahead of potential 2020 run

The Boston Globe's editorial board on Thursday panned a potential presidential run by Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenHillicon Valley: GOP lawmakers offer election security measure | FTC Dem worries government is 'captured' by Big Tech | Lawmakers condemn Apple over Hong Kong censorship Sanders seeks spark from Ocasio-Cortez at Queens rally On The Money: Supreme Court takes up challenge to CFPB | Warren's surge brings scrutiny to wealth tax | Senators eye curbs on Trump emergency powers MORE (D-Mass.), saying she would be a divisive figure when Democrats need to present a united front against President TrumpDonald John TrumpFlorida GOP lawmaker says he's 'thinking' about impeachment Democrats introduce 'THUG Act' to block funding for G-7 at Trump resort Kurdish group PKK pens open letter rebuking Trump's comparison to ISIS MORE.

“While Warren is an effective and impactful senator with an important voice nationally, she has become a divisive figure," the editorial board wrote. "A unifying voice is what the country needs now after the polarizing politics of Donald Trump.”

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A Warren candidacy, while likely to energize certain elements of the party's progressive wing, runs the risk of being mired in controversy over her claims to Native American ancestry. In October, she released the results of a DNA test that ended up drawing criticism from both sides of the aisle.

Warren’s office did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Hill.

The editorial board argued that the Democratic field for 2020 is likely to be crowded with diverse candidates and may include high-profile candidates such as former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump knocks Romney as 'Democrat secret asset' in new video Giuliani asked State Dept. to grant visa for ex-Ukraine official at center of Biden allegations: report Perry won't comply with subpoena in impeachment inquiry MORE, Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-Texas), Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper (D), former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg (D), and Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSanders seeks spark from Ocasio-Cortez at Queens rally On The Money: Supreme Court takes up challenge to CFPB | Warren's surge brings scrutiny to wealth tax | Senators eye curbs on Trump emergency powers Biden seeks to fundraise off fact he's running out of money MORE (I-Vt.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisHarris campaign releases web video highlighting opposition to death penalty Sanders seeks spark from Ocasio-Cortez at Queens rally Biden seeks to fundraise off fact he's running out of money MORE (D-Calif.) and Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerGabbard hits back at 'queen of warmongers' Clinton The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden camp faces new challenges Former public school teacher: Strikes 'wake-up call' for Democratic Party MORE (D-N.J.).

But the editorial board said Warren's time has passed.

“In 2015, this editorial page urged Warren to run, in part because of the lack of serious competition against Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonState cites 38 people for violations in Clinton email review Trump campaign to hold rallies in Mississippi, Kentucky Biden struggles to reverse fall MORE. (Clearing the decks for Clinton didn’t exactly end well for Democrats, did it?),” the editorial board wrote. “Warren missed her moment in 2016, and there’s reason to be skeptical of her prospective candidacy in 2020.”

While Warren coasted to reelection in November, she won with fewer votes and by a smaller margin than the reelection of Gov. Charlie Baker, the state’s Republican governor in an otherwise Democratic stronghold.

“Those are warning signs from the voters who know her best,” the editorial board wrote.

Warren has fueled speculation about a potential presidential campaign, telling voters at a town hall in September that she would think about running after the midterms.

However, the Globe cited Deval Patrick, the former Massachusetts governor who announced Thursday he would not run for president, as an example it says Warren should follow to scrap a possible run. 

“Politicians who ‘explore’ or ‘consider’ presidential campaigns set in motion a machine that can be hard to stop. Patrick did, and that’s to his credit. There’s no shame in testing the waters and deciding to stay on the beach,” the editorial board wrote.