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Warren has contacted 100 people in early 2020 primary states: report

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenCan Biden find a third way between Trumpism and Obama-era globalism? Left seeks to influence Biden picks while signaling unity Schwarzenegger says he would 'absolutely' help Biden administration MORE (D-Mass.) has reportedly reached out to roughly 100 people since the midterms in states like Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada, which host the first primaries and caucuses of the 2020 presidential primaries.

Politico reported Monday that Warren has personally contacted an estimated 100 people in early presidential states and has begun looking for a campaign headquarters space in Boston since the midterms concluded a month ago.

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The moves are just a few of several that indicate Warren is gearing up for a White House bid.

Politico reported that Warren has fielded a campaign staff of more than 50 people, including field workers.

Warren has yet to formally commit to whether she will run for president in 2020, but told supporters that she intended to consider the possibility after the midterm elections.

She is widely considered a likely candidate, along with Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersOn The Money: Unemployment gains lower than expected | Jobs report lights fire under coronavirus relief talks Sanders says he can't support bipartisan COVID-19 relief proposal in its current form Progressives push for direct payments to be included in COVID-19 relief deal MORE (I-Vt.), Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisBiden officially clinches Electoral College votes with California certification Hillicon Valley: Senate Intelligence Committee leaders warn of Chinese threats to national security | Biden says China must play by 'international norms' | House Democrats use Markup app for leadership contest voting Trump campaigns as wild card in Georgia runoffs MORE (D-Calif.), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandOvernight Defense: Defense bill among Congress's year-end scramble | Iranian scientist's assassination adds hurdles to Biden's plan on nuclear deal | Navy scrapping USS Bonhomme Richard after fire Democratic senators urge Facebook to take action on anti-Muslim bigotry Social media responds to Harris making history: 'I feel like our ancestors are rejoicing' MORE (D-N.Y.) and former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenAppeals court OKs White House diverting military funding to border wall construction Federal student loan payment suspension extended another month Pentagon: Tentative meeting between spy agencies, Biden transition set for early next week MORE, among others, in what will likely be a crowded Democratic primary field.

The Boston Globe, Warren's hometown newspaper, wrote in an editorial piece last week that the senator's time to run for president had passed, calling her a "divisive figure" and implying that she would not be the strongest candidate in 2020.

“While Warren is an effective and impactful senator with an important voice nationally, she has become a divisive figure," the editorial board wrote. "A unifying voice is what the country needs now after the polarizing politics of Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpAppeals court OKs White House diverting military funding to border wall construction Pentagon: Tentative meeting between spy agencies, Biden transition set for early next week Conservative policy director calls Section 230 repeal an 'existential threat' for tech MORE.”