Biden, Sanders lead field in Iowa poll

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoseph (Joe) Robinette BidenBrown launches tour in four early nominating states amid 2020 consideration 5 takeaways from Barr’s testimony Gillibrand announces exploratory committee to run for president on Colbert MORE and Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersBrown launches tour in four early nominating states amid 2020 consideration Gillibrand announces exploratory committee to run for president on Colbert Dem chairman Cummings meets with Trump health chief to discuss drug prices MORE (I-Vt.) lead the field of potential Democratic candidates for the 2020 presidential election, according to a poll of likely Iowa caucusgoers released Saturday.

Biden was the first choice of 32 percent of respondents, and Sanders, who finished second in the Democratic primary in 2016, followed with 19 percent.

"This is obviously a warm welcome to some people who are really familiar to caucusgoers in the state," said J. Ann Selzer, president of Selzer & Co., the firm that conducted the poll. "But there’s also some welcoming of newcomers who are only now starting to come to the state and get to know the people who could shape their future."

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Despite the top two candidates being veteran politicians, 36 percent of respondents said that a political "newcomer" is best suited to defeat President TrumpDonald John TrumpVeterans groups demand end to shutdown: 'Get your act together' Brown launches tour in four early nominating states amid 2020 consideration Pence on border wall: Trump won't be ‘deterred’ by Dem ‘obstruction’ MORE, according to the Des Moines Register/CNN/Mediacom poll.

Outgoing Rep. Beto O'RourkeRobert (Beto) Francis O'RourkeNew Hampshire is ‘must-win’ state for Warren, says veteran political reporter Democratic dark horses could ride high in 2020 Julián Castro announces 2020 White House bid, swipes at Trump MORE (D-Texas), who was favored by 11 percent of respondents, may fill that desire. O'Rourke was propelled into the presidential discussion after a close Senate race loss to Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward Cruz5 takeaways from Barr’s testimony Republicans seek to temper fallout from latest Russia bombshells Cruz says Americans outside Beltway unconcerned with Mueller investigation MORE (R-Texas).

He has met with a number of prominent Democrats in recent weeks, including former President Obama and the Rev. Al Sharpton.

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenBrown launches tour in four early nominating states amid 2020 consideration Gillibrand announces exploratory committee to run for president on Colbert Native American group denounces Trump for using Wounded Knee in attack against Warren MORE (D-Mass.) was the only other candidate to receive more than 5 percent of support, with 8 percent.

Democratic Sens. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisBrown launches tour in four early nominating states amid 2020 consideration 5 takeaways from Barr’s testimony Kamala Harris releases 'mixtape' on 'The Late Show' amid 2020 speculation MORE (Calif.), Cory BookerCory Anthony Booker5 takeaways from Barr’s testimony Booker presses Barr on impact of mass incarceration on black Americans Barr: I wouldn't go after businesses relying on Obama-era marijuana policy MORE (N.J.) and Amy KlobucharAmy Jean Klobuchar5 takeaways from Barr’s testimony Klobuchar dismisses mock campaign logo as something from 'very enthusiastic supporter' Grandson's note to Barr during confirmation hearing goes viral MORE (Minn.), all of whom have visited Iowa, were the first choices for 5, 4, and 3 percent of those polled, respectively. Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg also polled at 3 percent.

Biden and Sanders also had the highest name recognition among those included in the survey, with only 4 percent of respondents having no opinion them. 

Warren had the next highest share of people with a position on her with 84 percent, followed by Bloomberg at 71, O’Rourke at 64, Booker at 61 and Harris at 59 percent.

So far, none of the candidates have announced a campaign.

The poll asked likely Democratic caucusgoers in Iowa, the first state to hold caucuses, which candidate they would prefer out of a list of 20. The poll surveyed 455 people between Dec. 10-13, with a margin of error of 4.6 points.

The results of the Iowa poll lines up with a national survey on potential Democratic nominees from Friday that had Biden, with 30 percent, Sanders, with 14 percent, and O'Rourke, with 9 percent, as the three front-runners.