Klobuchar on 2020: ‘I do think you want voices from the Midwest’

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharPoll: Nearly 4 in 5 say they will consider candidates' stances on cybersecurity The Hill's Campaign Report: Battle for Senate begins to take shape Native American advocates question 2020 Democrats' commitment MORE (D-Minn.), one of over two dozen Democrats believed to be considering a presidential bid in 2020, said that while she isn’t definitively running, the Midwest is a region the party cannot afford to ignore. 

“I have been talking to people in my state and people around the country about it. I think that there are a lot of good people considering this, but I do think you want voices from the Midwest,” Klobuchar told The New Yorker in an interview published Tuesday. 

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“And I think you want to have people with different views running. I think it’s really important to have that. I don’t think it’s bad that we have a competition for the nomination at this key moment in our nation’s history,” she added, referring to the expectation that the number of Democratic candidates may be well into the double digits. 

In 2016 President TrumpDonald John TrumpO'Rourke: Trump driving global, U.S. economy into recession Manchin: Trump has 'golden opportunity' on gun reforms Objections to Trump's new immigration rule wildly exaggerated MORE unexpectedly won Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania, none of which had voted for a GOP presidential candidate since before 1992, to ascend to the White House.

One of the main focuses of the Democratic Party has been on how to bring voters in those states back into their fold.

Besides Klobuchar, other high-profile Democrats such as former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenPossible GOP challenger says Trump doesn't doesn't deserve reelection, but would vote for him over Democrat Joe Biden faces an uncertain path The Memo: Trump pushes back amid signs of economic slowdown MORE, Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersJoe Biden faces an uncertain path Bernie Sanders vows to go to 'war with white nationalism and racism' as president Biden: 'There's an awful lot of really good Republicans out there' MORE (I-Vt.), Kamal Harris (D-Calif.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenPossible GOP challenger says Trump doesn't doesn't deserve reelection, but would vote for him over Democrat Joe Biden faces an uncertain path The Memo: Trump pushes back amid signs of economic slowdown MORE (D-Mass.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerThe Hill's Campaign Report: Battle for Senate begins to take shape Steve King to Gillibrand: Odds of me resigning same as yours of winning presidential nomination We need a climate plan for agriculture MORE (D-N.J.), Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownThe Hill's Campaign Report: Battle for Senate begins to take shape Dayton Democrat launches challenge to longtime GOP rep Dayton mayor: Trump visit after shooting was 'difficult on the community' MORE (D-Ohio) and Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-Texas), among others, are also considering running in 2020. 

Klobuchar has shown an ability to woo Trump voters, winning reelection in November by about 24 points in a state Trump lost by only one point in 2016.

Klobuchar said the successful candidate in 2020 will be somebody with an ability not to follow Trump down every “rabbit hole” while also having an emotional appeal to voters.

“So I think you not just have to meet him with facts, and you certainly don’t want to go down every rabbit hole with him. But we have to meet him with emotion. And it doesn’t have to be negative emotion. It can be positive emotion,” she said, citing issues such as health care and immigration. 

She added that Trump’s brash temperament is a potential opening for his eventual opponent, saying it could actually hurt him in the rural communities that propelled him to victory two years ago.

“I think it matters when someone makes promises and then time goes on and your life hasn’t changed. So I do think it matters. And when you add disruptions in, and chaos, that makes things hard for you. So I think those things matter,” she said.

“[Y]ou really have to go to the core of what kind of person you want to have in the White House, that your kids watch on TV when they’re learning their civics lesson and the Pledge of Allegiance in first and second grade,” she added.