WHIP LIST: Who's in and out in the 2020 race

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenOvernight Defense: Senate panel adds B to Biden's defense budget | House passes bill to streamline visa process for Afghans who helped US | Pentagon confirms 7 Colombians arrested in Haiti leader's killing had US training On The Money: Senate braces for nasty debt ceiling fight | Democrats pushing for changes to bipartisan deal | Housing prices hit new high in June Hillicon Valley: Democrats introduce bill to hold platforms accountable for misinformation during health crises | Website outages hit Olympics, Amazon and major banks MORE is set to capture the Democratic nomination and challenge President TrumpDonald TrumpNew Capitol Police chief to take over Friday Overnight Health Care: Biden officials says no change to masking guidance right now | Missouri Supreme Court rules in favor of Medicaid expansion | Mississippi's attorney general asks Supreme Court to overturn Roe v. Wade Michael Wolff and the art of monetizing gossip MORE in November after emerging as the only remaining candidate from one of the party's largest contingents to run for president. 

Candidates are also vying for the Constitution nomination though they are unlikely to make a major impact, and the Libertarian Party while Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashAmash warns of turning lawmakers like Cheney into 'heroes' Cheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP Biden: 'Prince Philip gladly dedicated himself to the people of the UK' MORE (I-Mich.) has launched an exploratory committee to seek the Libertarian Party’s nomination. 

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 Here's a look at all the candidates who are in, out and on the fence for 2020.

Have an update to this list? Please contact Tal Axelrod (taxelrod@thehill.com).

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DEMOCRATS

IN

Joe Biden

"We have to remember who we are. This is America," the former vice president said in an April 25 video announcing his campaign.

                  

DROPPED OUT

Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetHow Sen. Graham can help fix the labor shortage with commonsense immigration reform For true American prosperity, make the child tax credit permanent Colorado lawmaker warns of fire season becoming year-round MORE (Colo.)

The two-term senator ended his bid for the Democratic presidential nomination on Feb. 11 after early returns in the New Hampshire primary showed him doing poorly after he failed to gain much momentum in the race. 

 

New York City Mayor Bill de BlasioBill de Blasio43 percent of NYPD employees vaccinated: report The Hill's Morning Report - Infrastructure vote fails; partisan feud erupts over Jan. 6 panel Israeli politician calls on Ben & Jerry's to 'rethink' ban MORE

The progressive Democrat exited the race on Sept. 20, saying "it's clearly not my time" to run for president. De Blasio had struggled in the polls, failing to make the September debate and was also at risk of not making it to the stage in October.

 

Michael BloombergMichael BloombergWhy Democrats' .5 trillion reconciliation bill is a losing game Democrats must win big on health care to have a shot in the midterms Stacey Abrams PAC tops 0 million raised MORE

The former New York City mayor dropped out of the race on March 4, one day after disappointing Super Tuesday results. He had spent hundreds of millions of dollars in advertisements after entering the race late.

 

Sen. Cory BookerCory BookerDemocrats criticize FBI's handling of tip line in Kavanaugh investigation Biden: Republicans who say Democrats want to defund the police are lying For true American prosperity, make the child tax credit permanent MORE (N.J.)

Booker suspended his presidential campaign on Jan. 13, acknowledging that he no longer has the resources to continue his bid for the Democratic nomination. 

 

South Bend Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegThe Hill's Morning Report - High-profile COVID-19 infections spark new worries Buttigieg says he'd go on space flight 'in a heartbeat' Biden signs sweeping order to bolster US competition, target big business MORE

The South Bend, Ind., mayor ended his campaign on March 1 after a poor finish in South Carolina's primary and just two days before Super Tuesday.

 

Montana Gov. Steve BullockSteve Bullock65 former governors, mayors back bipartisan infrastructure deal Arkansas, New Jersey governors to head National Governors Association Biden 'allies' painting him into a corner MORE

"I entered this race as a voice to win back the places we lost, bridge divides and rid our system of the corrupting influence of dark money," Montana Gov. Steve Bullock (D) said in a statement announcing the end of his campaign. "While the concerns that propelled me to enter in the first place have not changed, I leave this race filled with gratitude and optimism, inspired and energized by the good people I've had the privilege of meeting over the course of the campaign."

 

Julián Castro

The former Housing and Urban Development Secretary ended his campaign on Jan. 2, conceding that it "simply isn't our time" to win the nomination after struggling for more than a year to break through.

 

Former Rep. John DelaneyJohn DelaneyDirect air capture is a crucial bipartisan climate policy Lobbying world Coronavirus Report: The Hill's Steve Clemons interviews Rep. Rodney Davis MORE (Md.)

The independently wealthy 55-year-old former congressman dropped out of the race on Jan. 31, saying he did not want to peel votes away from other moderate candidates in the race.

 

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (Hawaii)

The congresswoman dropped out of the 2020 presidential contest on March 19 after failing to gain much traction in a race in which she was overshadowed by other Democrats in the presidential field.

 

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandSenators hail 'historic changes' as competing proposals to tackle military sexual assault advance Overnight Defense: Military justice overhaul included in defense bill | Pentagon watchdog to review security of 'nuclear football' | Pentagon carries out first air strike in Somalia under Biden Duckworth, Pressley introduce bill to provide paid family leave for those who experience miscarriage MORE (N.Y.)

Gillibrand said on Aug. 28 that she is dropping out of the race. She told The New York Times that she plans to endorse another candidate in the primary but has yet to pick which one. She stopped short of saying she would pick another woman in the race.

 

Former Sen. Mike Gravel (Alaska)

Gravel said on July 31 his campaign is "nearing its conclusion" and is looking to donate left-over funds. He later said he would form a left-leaning think tank that aims to help create a strong network of activists.

 

Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisRon Johnson: 'I may not be the best candidate' for 2022 midterms Poll: Potential Sununu-Hassan matchup in N.H. a dead heat  Biden's belated filibuster decision: A pretense of principle at work MORE (Calif.)

Harris ended her bid for the Democratic presidential nomination on Dec. 3, bringing to a close a rough stretch of several months that saw her poll numbers sink and her fundraising performances dry up.

  

Former Colorado Gov. John HickenlooperJohn HickenlooperBipartisan group says it's still on track after setback on Senate floor Colorado lawmaker warns of fire season becoming year-round The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden helps negotiate bipartisan infrastructure deal MORE

Hickenlooper dropped out of the 2020 race on August 15, while noting in a statement that he was giving "serious thought" to launching a Senate bid to challenge Sen. Cory GardnerCory GardnerEx-Sen. Cory Gardner joins lobbying firm Biden administration reverses Trump changes it says 'undermined' conservation program Gardner to lead new GOP super PAC ahead of midterms MORE (R) in Colorado. 

 

 
Inslee announced on Aug. 21 that he would drop out of the race after stagnating in the bottom of primary polling, recognizing, "It's become clear I'm not going to be carrying the ball, I'm not going to be president." The Washington Democrat made climate change the cornerstone of his failed White House bid, but said he believes "we are going to have a candidate to fight this battle."
 
 

Miramar, Fla., Mayor Wayne MessamWayne Martin MessamKey moments in the 2020 Democratic presidential race so far Wayne Messam suspends Democratic presidential campaign 2020 primary debate guide: Everything you need to know ahead of the November forum MORE

Messam said on Nov. 20 that he was suspending his campaign after announcing his bid in March. The Florida mayor failed to gain much traction having failed to qualify for any of the debates. 

 

Rep. Seth MoultonSeth MoultonOvernight Defense: Senate panel adds B to Biden's defense budget | House passes bill to streamline visa process for Afghans who helped US | Pentagon confirms 7 Colombians arrested in Haiti leader's killing had US training Business, labor groups teaming in high-speed rail push Here's what Congress is reading at the beach this summer MORE (Mass.)

Moulton announced on Aug. 23 that he would drop out of the Democratic presidential contest, becoming the third candidate in little more than a week to exit the race. The congressman announced his bid in April, but never gained traction and failed twice to make the Democratic debate stage. A Marine Corps veteran, Moulton made headlines as one of Rep. Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiDemocrats plow ahead with Jan. 6 probe, eyeing new GOP reinforcements GOP's Banks burnishes brand with Pelosi veto Meghan McCain on Pelosi, McCarthy fight: 'I think they're all bad' MORE’s (D-Calif.) top detractors in her bid to become Congress’s next Speaker. 

 

State Sen. Richard Ojeda (W.Va.)

The West Virginia state senator ended his long shot White House bid on Jan. 25, saying: “I don’t want to see people send money to a campaign that’s probably not going to get off the ground.” He had announced his candidacy in November, after losing his bid to represent the state's 3rd District to Republican Rep. Carol MillerCarol Devine MillerSix ways to visualize a divided America House GOP campaign arm rolls out new leadership team READ: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results MORE.

 

Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (Texas)

O'Rourke announced Nov. 1 that he would end his White House bid, saying it had become clear he did not have the means to continue in the race. The former Texas congressman had entered the primary battle on March 14 as a potential frontrunner but lagged in polling and fell behind several other candidates in fundraising heading into the fall.

 

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The former Massachusetts governor suspended his campaign on Feb. 12, a day after performing poorly in the New Hampshire primary, having failed to gain much traction after a late entry into the 2020 race.

 

Rep. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) RyanSix takeaways: What the FEC reports tell us about the midterm elections Schumer, Tim Scott lead as Senate fundraising pace heats up Here's what Congress is reading at the beach this summer MORE (Ohio)

Ryan exited the race on Oct. 24, announcing he'd return to Ohio to begin work on his congressional reelection campaign. Ryan, who failed to gain traction both in polling and fundraising, touted his campaign's efforts to fight for working-class Americans.

"I will continue to advocate and fight for the working people of this country," he said. "And so I'll continue the fight, and I appreciate all of the effort on behalf of our volunteers, our staff, who chipped in money and made a sacrifice to help get this campaign up and running."

 

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.)

The Vermont Independent suspended his presidential bid on April 8, ending a campaign that once appeared on track to dominate the Democratic nominating contest but that quickly lost momentum. 

 

 Former Rep. Joe Sestak (Pa.) 

Former Rep. Joe Sestak (D-Pa.) announced his withdrawal from the race, saying in a press release that he was thankful for what he called an "endeavor filled with immeasurable wisdom, passions, humor and insights to, and from, the people of America."

 

Tom SteyerTom SteyerOvernight Energy: 'Eye of fire,' Exxon lobbyist's comments fuel renewed attacks on oil industry | Celebrities push Biden to oppose controversial Minnesota pipeline | More than 75 companies ask Congress to pass clean electricity standard Celebrities push Biden to oppose controversial Minnesota pipeline Six things to watch as California heads for recall election MORE

The billionaire businessman dropped out of the presidential race on Feb. 29 after a poor finish in South Carolina despite spending big to compete in the state.

 

Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellTech executives increased political donations amid lobbying push Justice in legal knot in Mo Brooks, Trump case Mo Brooks's Jan. 6 defense raises questions about official immunity and DOJ strategy MORE (Calif.)

The California Democrat dropped out of the 2020 Democratic presidential primary in July, three months after announcing his presidential bid. He will run instead for reelection for a fifth term in the House. 

 

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (Mass.)

Warren dropped out of the 2020 presidential race after failing to perform well in the early primary contests and on Super Tuesday, when she came in third in her home state of Massachusetts. 

 

Marianne WilliamsonMarianne WilliamsonMarianne Williamson calls on Biden to drop efforts to extradite Assange Susan Sarandon and Marianne Williamson call for justice in Steven Donziger case Marianne Williamson: Refusal to hike minimum wage is part of 'rigged economy' MORE

Author Marianne Williamson dropped out of the presidential primary on Jan. 10, writing in a note to supporters on her website that her campaign would not be able to get enough votes to "to elevate our conversation any more than it is now."

 

Andrew YangAndrew YangKings launch voting rights effort honoring John Lewis Eric Adams to meet with Biden on curbing gun violence Adams victory in NYC reignites Democratic debate on crime, policing MORE

The entrepreneur dropped out of the race on Feb. 11 just after polls closed for New Hampshire's primary. Yang centered his campaign around a universal basic income of giving every American adult $1,000 a month and dire warnings of the threats of automation, but failed to break into the top tier of candidates. 
 

 

MAYBE  

Former California Gov. Jerry Brown

A 2020 bid would be Brown’s fourth White House candidacy. At 80 years old, he is the oldest prospective candidate in the field, but has not ruled out a presidential campaign.

       

John KerryJohn KerryNo. 2 State Department official to travel to China amid tensions US and Germany launch climate partnership Biden meets with Merkel in German leader's last official trip to Washington MORE

The former senator, former secretary of State and 2004 presidential nominee has refused multiple times to rule out another run for president. He told CBS News in August that he will continue to be an activist and he’s “going to continue to fight.”

 

Mitch Landrieu

The former New Orleans mayor has maintained that he doesn’t know if he’ll run for president, but a speech he gave last year about removing Confederate monuments generated 2020 buzz.

  

NO  

 

Stacey Abrams 

The 2018 Democratic Georgia gubernatorial nominee announced Aug. 13 that she would not run for president in 2020, instead choosing to focus her efforts on combating voter suppression. Abrams emerged as a kind of political rock star in 2018 after she came within 2 points of defeating Republican Brian Kemp in the Georgia governor’s race. Her efforts to expand Fair Fight Action, the voting rights group she founded, include training staffers this year in 20 states to work against voter suppression.

 

Michael Avenatti

The attorney for adult-film star Stormy Daniels burst onto the national scene amid Daniels’s legal battles with Trump, and Avenatti said for months that he was thinking about running. But he announced in December that he had decided not to make a presidential bid at the request of his family.

 

Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownTransit funding, broadband holding up infrastructure deal Negotiators struggle to finish infrastructure deal with clock ticking For true American prosperity, make the child tax credit permanent MORE (Ohio)

The Ohio Democrat announced on March 7 that he would remain in the Senate after embarking on an exploratory four-state tour of crucial early primary states. He said he would continue to promote his "Dignity of Work" platform, saying, "It is how we beat Trump, and it is how we should govern."

 

Sen. Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyLawmakers introduce bipartisan Free Britney Act A plan to address the growing orphaned wells crisis Free Britney movement calls for congressional hearing ahead of DC rally MORE Jr. (Pa.)

Casey said in January that he would not run for president. "I have concluded that the best way for me to fight for the America that so many of us believe in is to stay in the U.S. Senate and not run for the presidency in 2020,” he said in a statement. Casey had been floated as a possible contender after he won reelection by double-digits in 2018 in a state Trump won two years earlier.

 

Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonJill Biden takes starring role at difficult Olympics Club for Growth goes after Cheney in ad, compares her to Clinton Sanders to campaign for Turner in Ohio MORE

"I'm not running," the 2016 Democratic nominee told a New York TV station on March 4. But she added that she would continue "working and speaking and standing up for what I believe."

 

New York Gov. Andrew CuomoAndrew CuomoNew York bans underage marriages, raises age of consent to 18 Former speed skater launches bid for Stefanik seat Don't let the rule of law become a victim of COVID-19 MORE

After being floated for months as a possible candidate, the New York governor officially shot down all speculation in November. Saying that he has a “full plate” as governor, Cuomo said he was ruling out running for president.

 

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti

A source close to the Los Angeles mayor, who visited Iowa earlier this year and said he was contemplating a 2020 run, confirmed that he was not going to enter the Democratic primary field.

 

Andrew Gillum

Gillum confirmed in March that he will not run for president in 2020. The former Tallahassee mayor and Florida gubernatorial candidate launched a voter registration campaign to recruit more potential Democratic voters to try to turn the key battleground state in Democrats' favor in 2020.

 

Former Rep. Luis Gutiérrez (Ill.)

Gutiérrez revealed earlier this year that he had decided not to run for president, saying that the “best use of my time and my energy” would be to focus on mobilizing Latino voters in Pennsylvania and Ohio.

 

Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderBiden under pressure to pick new breed of federal prosecutors Obama says Senate will vote again on voting rights Obama: Voting rights bill must pass before next election MORE

The former attorney general said in a Washington Post op-ed on March 4 that he had decided against running for president. "Though I will not run for president in 2020, I will continue to fight for the future of our country through the National Democratic Redistricting Committee and its affiliates," Holder wrote, referring to the organization he chairs that fights against gerrymandering. 

 

Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineSenate GOP likely to nix plan Schumer feels pressure from all sides on spending strategy Manchin signals he'll be team player on spending deal MORE (Va.)

Clinton’s running mate in 2016 has been rumored as a potential candidate in 2020, but he has said he won’t run. When asked last year by the Richmond Times-Dispatch if he would run for the White House, the Virginia senator responded, “Nope. Nope.”

 

Rep. Joe KennedyJoseph (Joe) Patrick KennedySupreme Court confounding its partisan critics Warren says she'll run for reelection to Senate Five centrist Democrats oppose Pelosi for Speaker in tight vote MORE III (Mass.)

Kennedy has suggested that he won’t run for president in multiple interviews. He told Nantucket Magazine in June 2018 running is “not on my horizon” and responded “Six ways from Tuesday, no,” when asked in November about a presidential bid.

 

Terry McAuliffe 

McAuliffe, the former Virginia governor with strong ties to the Clintons, said in April that he will forego a presidential bid to help Democrats retake control of the state House and Senate. “I invested a lot in that state and I love that state. We’ve got to win the House and the Senate in that state,” McAuliffe said on CNN. “I’m gonna coordinate these campaigns for the House and the Senate.”

 

Sen. Jeff MerkleyJeff MerkleyLawmakers urge Biden to make 'bold decisions' in nuclear review This week: Senate faces infrastructure squeeze Accused Capitol rioter's bail revoked after leaving lewd voicemails for probation officer MORE (Ore.)

"I believe that there are Democrats now in the presidential race who are speaking to the importance of tackling the big challenges we face," he said in a March 5 video announcing his decision.

 

Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyOn The Money: Senate braces for nasty debt ceiling fight | Democrats pushing for changes to bipartisan deal | Housing prices hit new high in June Democrats pushing for changes to bipartisan infrastructure deal House bill targets US passport backlog MORE (Conn.)

Murphy shot down speculation that he may run for president in 2020, writing in a tweet that he will not do so in no uncertain terms. "I’ve been pretty transparent about this, but let me be 100% clear: I’m not running in 2020. I love the job I have now," he said.

 

California Gov. Gavin NewsomGavin NewsomJudge clears way for Larry Elder to appear on California recall ballot Caitlyn Jenner pledges to support Trump if he makes another bid for the White House Harris says she will campaign for Newsom in California recall election MORE 

Newsom has asserted that he won’t run for president, saying earlier this year that he has “no aspiration” to do so and that he planned to focus full time on his role as California’s next governor. On Feb. 15, he endorsed Kamala Harris's bid for president and said he will be one of the campaign's California co-chairmen.

  

Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaJill Biden takes starring role at difficult Olympics Obama to adapt memoir 'Dreams From My Father' for young readers Harris emerges as main GOP foil on campaign trail MORE

The former first lady and best-selling author has said several times that she won’t follow in her husband’s footsteps by running for president. In October, she told NBC’s “Today” that she “absolutely” won’t run. The former first lady then said at an event in December that her path “has never been politics” as she again shot down speculation that she’ll run.

  

Martin O'Malley

The former governor of Maryland, who sought the Democratic nomination in 2016, declared in January he would not run again and urged O’Rourke to make a bid for the White House. “America is looking for a candidacy newer than I can offer,” O’Malley wrote in the Des Moines Register. He previously fueled speculation he was considering another presidential campaign by making several trips to Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina.

 

Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo 

Raimondo, the new head of the Democratic Governors Association, said in December that taking over that role means she won’t run for president in 2020.

  

Oprah WinfreyOprah Gail WinfreyPrince Harry announces memoir Meghan Markle announces animated Netflix series focused on 12-year-old girl inspired by historical women William, Harry unveil Diana statue together MORE

Winfrey first sparked buzz about a 2020 bid when she gave a stirring speech at the Golden Globes last January, declaring that “a new day is on the horizon.” But she has since repeatedly said she won’t run for president. The billionaire told Jimmy KimmelJames (Jimmy) Christian KimmelMegan Fox: Critics who bashed Trump 'legend' remark have a 'burn a witch at the stake mentality' Trump is gone, but the jokes remain James Corden to change popular segment after backlash MORE in February that she was “definitely not running” and said in July that “the nastiness” of politics “would kill me.”

 

Sally YatesSally Caroline YatesSally Yates: I never thought that I'd be saying, 'Yeah, go Liz Cheney' ABC lands first one-on-one TV interview with Garland since confirmation Appointing a credible, non-partisan Jan. 6 commission should not be difficult MORE

The former acting attorney general said earlier this year that she has no desire to run for public office. It’s something she has not “ever felt drawn to,” Yates said.

 

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REPUBLICANS

YES 

President Trump

The president has made clear since his inauguration that he’ll seek another term in 2020. He filed campaign paperwork with the Federal Election Commission on the day he was inaugurated and has already raised tens of millions of dollars for his 2020 campaign. 

  

DROPPED OUT

Former Rep. Mark SanfordMark SanfordTop cyber Pentagon official overseeing defense contractor project placed on leave Cheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP GOP braces for wild week with momentous vote MORE (S.C.)

Sanford, also a former governor in South Carolina, said on Nov. 12 he would end his longshot bid to unseat Trump, leaving the race about two months after announcing his challenge.   

 

 
Walsh, who is now a conservative radio host, ended his primary campaign against Trump for the Republican presidential nomination on Feb. 7, after receiving just one percent of the vote in the Iowa caucuses. 
 
 
Former Massachusetts Gov. William Weld

Weld ended on March 18 his longshot bid to defeat Trump in the Republican primary, suspending his campaign a day after the the president passed the delegate threshold required to be the presumptive GOP nominee.

 

MAYBE

Rep. Justin Amash (Mich.)

Amash has repeatedly declined to rule out running for president, though it would be unclear under which party he could launch a bid after he decided to leave the Republican Party. The five-term lawmaker was the only Republican member of Congress to support impeachment proceedings against Trump.

 

Former Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerCheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP How leaving Afghanistan cancels our post-9/11 use of force The unflappable Liz Cheney: Why Trump Republicans have struggled to crush her  MORE (Tenn.)

Asked about a presidential run, the former senator from Tennessee told reporters last year that he had not "ruled it out.” He also told MSNBC in December that the GOP has to “remember what the Republican party is” when asked if Trump should face a primary challenger.

  

NO

Former Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeBiden nominates former Sen. Tom Udall as New Zealand ambassador Biden to nominate Jane Hartley as UK ambassador: report The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Goldman Sachs - Voting rights will be on '22, '24 ballots MORE (Ariz.)

Flake announced on Jan. 29 that he would not run in a primary against President Trump for the Republican nomination. "I have always said that I do hope that there is a Republican who challenges the president in the primary. I still hope that somebody does, but that somebody won't be me. I will not be a candidate," Flake said.

 

Nikki HaleyNikki HaleyPoll: Trump leads 2024 GOP primary trailed by Pence, DeSantis Trump is a complication for Republican hopes in Virginia The Memo: Trump is diminished but hasn't faded MORE

The former United Nations ambassador has been a rising star of the Republican Party since she was the governor of South Carolina, and multiple op-eds have speculated that she would pose a tough primary challenge to Trump in 2020. However, she said in October when she announced her resignation from the administration that she is not running and is planning to campaign for Trump.

 

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan  

Hogan announced on June 1 he would not challenge Trump in the primary, opting to focus his time on fulfilling a second term as Maryland governor.

“I truly appreciate all of the encouragement I received from people around the nation urging me to consider making a run for President in 2020. However, I will not be a candidate,” Hogan said in a statement. 

 

Former Ohio Gov. John Kasich 

The fierce Trump critic said on May 31 he sees "no path" to beat Trump in a primary, and saying he does not enter political races he cannot win.

"There is no path right now for me. I don't see a way to get there," Kasich said in a CNN interview, citing Trump's strong backing among GOP voters.

"Maybe somebody wants to run and make a statement and that's fine, but I've never gotten involved in a political race where I didn't think I could win," he added. 

  

Sen. Ben SasseBen SasseSasse calls China's Xi a 'coward' after Apple Daily arrest Defunct newspaper's senior editor arrested in Hong Kong Murkowski: Trump has 'threatened to do a lot' to those who stand up to him MORE (Neb.)

The Nebraska senator has dismissed speculation that he could run for president in 2020. Sasse said in September that his odds of running were low, adding that it was more likely he runs for “the noxious weed control board of Dodge County, Neb.” 

 

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INDEPENDENTS/THIRD PARTY

 

YES

Don Blankenship

Former coal executive Don Blankenship said on Nov. 11 that he will make a 2020 White House bid as a Constitution Party candidate. He took aim at President Trump in his 2020 announcement, saying the president's ego prevents him from getting stuff done.

 

Lincoln Chafee

The former Rhode Island senator and governor filed to run for the Libertarian Party nomination, according to a CNN report on Jan. 6.

 

MAYBE

Justin Amash

The vocal Trump critic in April launched an exploratory committee to seek the Libertarian Party’s presidential nomination, his strongest indication yet that he will mount a third party White House bid.

 

Mark CubanMark CubanNFL player said he'll get vaccinated if he can earn a profit from it Common sense rules can cure cryptocurrency's curse On The Money: Consumer prices jumped 5 percent annually in May | GOP senators say bipartisan group has infrastructure deal MORE

Cuban told The New York Times in June 2018 that he has given thought to a presidential bid in 2020, but he declined to discuss it further. The billionaire owner of the Dallas Mavericks, who has been an outspoken critic of Trump, hasn’t previously held public office. He also said last year that if he were to run, it would likely be as an independent.

  

NO

Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson

The actor was among the celebrities rumored as a possible 2020 candidate, but he told Vanity Fair in July  2018 that despite having “seriously considered” running, it wouldn’t be possible given his schedule.

 

Howard Schultz

The former Starbucks CEO said in a letter sent to supporters on Sept. 6 that he is no longer considering a 2020 presidential bid, noting that “an independent campaign for the White House is not how I can best serve our country at this time” and expressing concerns that a third-party run could reelect Trump.

Updated Feb. 12, 2020