Vermont newspaper editorial board: 'We beg' Bernie Sanders not to run in 2020

The editorial board for The Barre-Montpelier Times Argus, a newspaper in Vermont, is urging Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersWomen's March plans 'Medicare for All' day of lobbying in DC Group aiming to draft Beto O’Rourke unveils first 2020 video Why Joe Biden (or any moderate) cannot be nominated MORE (I-Vt.) not to run for president in 2020.

"Bernie Sanders should not run for president. In fact, we beg him not to," the editorial board begins in a piece published on Saturday

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The editorial board, which endorsed Hillary Clinton for the Democratic presidential nominee in 2016, goes on to say that they have more reasons to be concerned than excited about another Sanders run for the White House. It writes about its fears that a Sanders run for president could divide "the well-fractured Democratic Party, and could lead to another split in the 2020 presidential vote."

"There is too much at stake to take that gamble," the board continues. "If we are going to maintain a two-party system, the mandate needs to be a clear one. There is strength in numbers, and if anything has been shown in recent years, it is that unless tallies are overwhelming, there can always be questions or challenges raised over what 'vote totals' really mean: popular vote vs. Electoral College results.

"For us, this comes down to principle over ego. It is one thing to start a revolution, but at a certain point you need to know when to step out of the way and let others carry the water for you."

The board adds that Sanders has developed a loyal following because of certain progressive policies he's championed. But it says that Sanders has become "exhausting" as a candidate and that his personality is "abrasive."

"He can be dismissive and rude in his arrogance. You are either with Bernie Sanders or you are not," the board writes, before charging that his "no-nonsense approach" is comparable to President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump directed Cohen to lie to Congress about plans to build Trump Tower in Moscow during 2016 campaign: report DC train system losing 0k per day during government shutdown Senate Republicans eye rules change to speed Trump nominees MORE's. 

The board notes that "all signs point to another run, even with accusations" that aides working on his last presidential campaign experienced sexism and harassment in 2016.

Sanders, who was a tough challenger to Clinton in the 2016 Democratic primary, said last week that he was unaware of the accusations at the time. 

Sanders is one of many high-profile politicians considering a run for president in 2020. Former Vice President Joe Biden, former Rep. Beto O'Rourke (D-Texas) and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg have all floated the idea of running, while Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenOn The Money: Shutdown Day 27 | Trump fires back at Pelosi by canceling her foreign travel | Dems blast 'petty' move | Trump also cancels delegation to Davos | House votes to disapprove of Trump lifting Russia sanction Group aiming to draft Beto O’Rourke unveils first 2020 video The Hill’s 12:30 Report: Day 27 of the shutdown | Cohen reportedly paid company to rig online polls, boost his own image | Atlantic publishes ‘Impeach Donald Trump’ cover story MORE (D-Mass.) announced the formation of an exploratory committee last week.

Sanders and Biden are considered the top Democratic choices to run for president, according to a poll of likely Iowa caucus goers released in December.

Updated at 8:53 p.m.