Julián Castro calls for ‘tuition-free’ public colleges, apprenticeships

Julián Castro calls for ‘tuition-free’ public colleges, apprenticeships
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Democratic presidential candidate Julián Castro on Wednesday called for “tuition free” public colleges, apprenticeships and other certification programs as a way to make the U.S. workforce more competitive.

Castro, the former Housing and Urban Development (HUD) secretary, had initially called for more “accessible and affordable” higher education when he announced his candidacy, but went a step further at a New Hampshire event on Wednesday.

Tuition-free public colleges and universities is a progressive policy that Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersDemocratic senator will introduce bill mandating social distancing on flights after flying on packed flight Neil Young opposes use of his music at Trump Mt Rushmore event: 'I stand in solidarity with the Lakota Sioux' Democratic strategist Andrew Feldman says Biden is moving left MORE (I-Vt.) pushed for in his 2016 presidential campaign.

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"We need to ensure, if we want to be competitive, that every single American who wants a higher education can get one,” Castro said at a Politics & Eggs event at Saint Anselm College in New Hampshire.

“That’s why I believe that we need to work toward a tuition-free system of public university, college, apprenticeship and certification programs in this country to have the smartest, most well-prepared work force that we can in this 21st century,” he said.

During his presidential announcement speech last weekend, Castro said he supported a “Medicare for all” single-payer health care system and universal prekindergarten. At Wednesday’s event, Castro touted his work as San Antonio mayor when voters in 2012 approved “Pre-K for SA," which was covered by a sales tax increase.

“We need to make sure every single student gets off to a strong start in life, and if I’m elected president, I’m going to make pre-K for the USA happen in this country because it’s right for our students,” Castro said Wednesday in New Hampshire.

Since announcing his intention to seek the presidency, Castro made his first trip as a candidate to Puerto Rico, skipping over more traditional visits to early nominating states like Iowa.

Castro is among a quickly growing field of White House contenders including Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenThe Hill's Campaign Report: Biden chips away at Trump's fundraising advantage Warnock raises almost M in Georgia Senate race in second quarter The Hill's Morning Report - Trump lays low as approval hits 18-month low MORE (D-Mass.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandDemocratic lawmakers call for expanding, enshrining LGBTQ rights The Hill's 12:30 Report: Fauci 'aspirationally hopeful' of a vaccine by winter The Hill's Morning Report - Officials crack down as COVID-19 cases soar MORE (D-N.Y.). Other possible candidates still weighing a bid include Sanders and former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenCan Republicans handle the aftermath of Donald Trump? Biden seeks to supplant Trump in Georgia Trump's Mount Rushmore stunt will backfire MORE.