Poll shows 36 percent support Trump's reelection, 43 percent prefer generic Democrat

Poll shows 36 percent support Trump's reelection, 43 percent prefer generic Democrat
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Only about one-third of registered voters say they’ll vote to reelect President TrumpDonald John Trump Trump responds to calls to tear down monuments with creation of 'National Garden' of statues Trump: Children are taught in school to 'hate their own country' Trump accuses those tearing down statues of wanting to 'overthrow the American Revolution' MORE in 2020, according to a Harvard CAPS/Harris poll released exclusively to The Hill on Tuesday.

The poll found that 36 percent of voters support Trump in 2020, with 25 percent of them saying they’d definitely vote for the president. Meanwhile, 43 percent say they’d vote for an unnamed Democratic candidate in next year’s elections.

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Ten percent of voters say they would vote for an independent or another candidate, and 11 percent are undecided more than a year and half out from the 2020 elections.

Meanwhile, Trump’s approval numbers have remained steady amid the longest government shutdown in U.S. history, with 45 percent who approve of the president’s handling of the job and 55 percent who disapprove.

But the president faces a hurdle on likability. Twenty-nine percent of voters say they like him, while 58 percent dislike Trump.

“Trump’s reelection number remains low, but he is not yet facing a specific candidate,” said Mark Penn, co-director of Harvard CAPS/Harris Poll.

“A lot of voters are shopping for an alternative despite widespread approval of his economic and anti terrorism policies.”

More Democrats are jumping into the race for the 2020 nomination, and of the candidates, former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenCan Republicans handle the aftermath of Donald Trump? Biden seeks to supplant Trump in Georgia Trump's Mount Rushmore stunt will backfire MORE leads in terms of voter preference, with 24 percent picking him.

Biden got 23 percent of the vote when 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonCan Republicans handle the aftermath of Donald Trump? Biden seeks to supplant Trump in Georgia Hillary Clinton: 'I would have done a better job' handling coronavirus MORE was removed. 

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersDemocratic senator will introduce bill mandating social distancing on flights after flying on packed flight Neil Young opposes use of his music at Trump Mt Rushmore event: 'I stand in solidarity with the Lakota Sioux' Democratic strategist Andrew Feldman says Biden is moving left MORE (I-Vt.) is steady in second place. Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-Texas) is in third, but gets bumped down to fourth when Clinton is polled, with 8 percent of support.

Biden, Sanders and O’Rourke are all considering White House bids and expected to make decisions in the coming weeks.

Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenThe Hill's Campaign Report: Biden chips away at Trump's fundraising advantage Warnock raises almost M in Georgia Senate race in second quarter The Hill's Morning Report - Trump lays low as approval hits 18-month low MORE (D-Mass.), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandDemocratic lawmakers call for expanding, enshrining LGBTQ rights The Hill's 12:30 Report: Fauci 'aspirationally hopeful' of a vaccine by winter The Hill's Morning Report - Officials crack down as COVID-19 cases soar MORE (D-N.Y.) and Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisSenators push foreign media to disclose if they are registered as foreign agents Warnock raises almost M in Georgia Senate race in second quarter Liberal veterans group urges Biden to name Duckworth VP MORE (D-Calif.) have all recently announced their intentions to seek the presidency. But at the time the poll was conducted, Harris wasn’t officially in the race.

When Clinton’s name isn’t factored in, Harris is right behind O’Rourke at 7 percent. Warren and Gillibrand lag in the low-single digits.

Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardFinancial firms facing serious hacking threat in COVID-19 era Gabbard drops defamation lawsuit against Clinton It's as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process MORE (D-Hawaii) and former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro, who are also running, are at 2 percent and 1 percent, respectively.

The Harvard CAPS/Harris Poll online survey of 1,540 registered voters was conducted from Jan. 15 to 16.

The Harvard CAPS/Harris Poll is a collaboration of the Center for American Political Studies at Harvard University and The Harris Poll. The Hill will be working with Harvard/Harris Poll throughout 2019.

Full poll results will be posted online later this week. The Harvard CAPS/Harris Poll survey is an online sample drawn from the Harris Panel and weighted to reflect known demographics. As a representative online sample, it does not report a probability confidence interval.