Trump campaign slams Warren as ‘fraud’

President TrumpDonald John TrumpDemocrats' CNN town halls exposed an extreme agenda Buttigieg says he doubts Sanders can win general election Post-Mueller, Trump has a good story to tell for 2020 MORE’s campaign wasted no time going after Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenDemocrats' CNN town halls exposed an extreme agenda Minorities, older adults push Biden to top of 2020 poll The difference between good and bad tax reform MORE (D-Mass.) on Saturday shortly before she was expected to formally announce her candidacy for the White House in 2020.

“Elizabeth Warren has already been exposed as a fraud by the Native Americans she impersonated and disrespected to advance her professional career, and the people of Massachusetts she deceived to get elected,” Trump campaign manager Brad Parscale said in a statement.

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“The American people will reject her dishonest campaign and socialist ideas like the Green New Deal, that will raise taxes, kill jobs and crush America's middle class. Only under President Trump's leadership will America continue to grow safer, secure and more prosperous,” he added.

The statement came just before Warren was slated to give a speech in which she was widely expected to announce her bid for the presidency.

It marked the first time that the Trump campaign has issued such a statement blasting an announcement from a Democratic presidential hopeful, after several candidates jumped into the race earlier this year.

Warren, an outspoken critic of Trump and his administration, has maintained a fraught relationship with the president throughout his tenure. 

Trump early on latched onto Warren's past claims of Native American ancestry, often questioning those claims and disparagingly referring to her as "Pocahontas."

Warren's claims of Native American heritage has continued to dog her as she has explored a presidential bid.

Warren sought to get ahead of criticism stemming from those claims by releasing the results of a DNA test in October. The results "strong evidence" she had Native American ancestry, likely from an ancestor from between six and 10 generations ago.

Still, the senator was rebuffed by many Native Americans for taking the test, prompting her to apologize. Native Americans scrutinized Warren's decision, expressing concerns about using science and DNA tests to gauge racial and ethnic identity. 

“This is our family’s story, and it’s all consistent from that point in time. But as I said, it’s important to note I’m not a tribal citizen, and I should have been more mindful of the distinction,” Warren told reporters on Wednesday.

Warren previously apologized to members of the Cherokee Nation for her claims.