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Klobuchar says she will kick off campaign in Wisconsin, alludes to 2016 controversy

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharGoogle completes Fitbit acquisition Hillicon Valley: Fringe social networks boosted after Capitol attack | Planned protests spark fears of violence in Trump's final days | Election security efforts likely to gain ground in Democrat-controlled Congress US Chamber of Commerce to stop supporting some lawmakers following the Capitol riots MORE (D-Minn.) announced on Sunday she was kicking off her campaign for president in Wisconsin, while making an apparent allusion to criticism over former Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonMillennials and the great reckoning on race Biden chooses Amanda Gorman as youngest known inaugural poet Can Biden encompass the opposition he embodied? MORE's decision not to visit the state extensively during the 2016 election.

"We're going to be in Iowa and in Wisconsin," Klobuchar said during her campaign unveiling in Minneapolis.

"I think we're starting in Wisconsin because as you remember there wasn't a lot of campaigning in Wisconsin in 2016. With me, that changes."

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Her comment comes as her party hopes to win back voters in the states of Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania, traditionally Democratic strongholds they lost to President TrumpDonald TrumpCIA chief threatened to resign over push to install Trump loyalist as deputy: report Azar in departure letter says Capitol riot threatens to 'tarnish' administration's accomplishments Justice Dept. argues Trump should get immunity from rape accuser's lawsuit MORE in 2016. 

After winning the Democratic primary in April 2016, Clinton did not visit Wisconsin.

Trump on the other hand visited the state five times after the Republican convention in July 2016. He would go on to defeat Clinton by 47.2 percent to 46.5 percent in the state during the general election.

Clinton was criticized after Trump's victory for not focusing more of her campaign's energy on states like Wisconsin and Michigan, with some arguing her failure to do so cost her the election.

She addressed the Wisconsin loss in her 2017 book "What Happened." 

"If just 40,000 people across Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania had changed their minds, I would have won," Clinton wrote. "With a margin like that, everyone can have a pet theory about why I lost. It's difficult to rule anything out. But every theory needs to be tested against the evidence that I was winning until October 28, when [former FBI Director] Jim Comey injected emails back into the election."

Klobuchar did not mention Trump or Clinton by name in her campaign launch speech.

The Minnesota Democrat will also be visiting Iowa in the upcoming week, a sign that she is focusing on the midwest as her base, at least as of now.

Many of the other candidates who have announced their campaigns, like Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenPorter loses seat on House panel overseeing financial sector OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Nine, including former Michigan governor, charged over Flint water crisis | Regulator finalizes rule forcing banks to serve oil, gun companies | Trump admin adds hurdle to increase efficiency standards for furnaces, water heaters DeVos mulled unilateral student loan forgiveness as COVID-19 wracked economy: memo MORE (D-Mass.), Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisOn The Money: Retail sales drop in latest sign of weakening economy | Fast-food workers strike for minimum wage | US officials raise concerns over Mexico's handling of energy permits Biden scolds Republicans for not wearing masks during Capitol attack Biden and the new Congress must protect Americans from utility shutoffs MORE (D-Calif.) and Cory BookerCory BookerNCAA tables name, image and likeness vote after DOJ warns of potential antitrust violations Warren and other senators seek investigation into Trump administration resuming federal executions Cory Booker says he has no plans to propose to Rosario Dawson this Christmas MORE (D-N.J.), represent coastal states.

South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D) has made his ties to the Midwest a central part of his presidential campaign that he announced recently.