Klobuchar says she will kick off campaign in Wisconsin, alludes to 2016 controversy

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharThe Hill's Morning Report - Is impeachment back on the table? New Hampshire senator to ask 2020 Dems to back repeal of state residency law Booker to supporter who wanted him to punch Trump: 'Black guys like us, we don't get away with that' MORE (D-Minn.) announced on Sunday she was kicking off her campaign for president in Wisconsin, while making an apparent allusion to criticism over former Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonIt is wrong to say 'no collusion' 10 factors making Russia election interference the most enduring scandal of the Obama era And the winner of the Robert Mueller Sweepstakes is — Vladimir Putin MORE's decision not to visit the state extensively during the 2016 election.

"We're going to be in Iowa and in Wisconsin," Klobuchar said during her campaign unveiling in Minneapolis.

"I think we're starting in Wisconsin because as you remember there wasn't a lot of campaigning in Wisconsin in 2016. With me, that changes."

ADVERTISEMENT

Her comment comes as her party hopes to win back voters in the states of Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania, traditionally Democratic strongholds they lost to President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump calls Sri Lankan prime minister following church bombings Ex-Trump lawyer: Mueller knew Trump had to call investigation a 'witch hunt' for 'political reasons' The biggest challenge from the Mueller Report depends on the vigilance of everyone MORE in 2016. 

After winning the Democratic primary in April 2016, Clinton did not visit Wisconsin.

Trump on the other hand visited the state five times after the Republican convention in July 2016. He would go on to defeat Clinton by 47.2 percent to 46.5 percent in the state during the general election.

Clinton was criticized after Trump's victory for not focusing more of her campaign's energy on states like Wisconsin and Michigan, with some arguing her failure to do so cost her the election.

She addressed the Wisconsin loss in her 2017 book "What Happened." 

"If just 40,000 people across Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania had changed their minds, I would have won," Clinton wrote. "With a margin like that, everyone can have a pet theory about why I lost. It's difficult to rule anything out. But every theory needs to be tested against the evidence that I was winning until October 28, when [former FBI Director] Jim Comey injected emails back into the election."

Klobuchar did not mention Trump or Clinton by name in her campaign launch speech.

The Minnesota Democrat will also be visiting Iowa in the upcoming week, a sign that she is focusing on the midwest as her base, at least as of now.

Many of the other candidates who have announced their campaigns, like Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenTrump pushes back on impeachment talk: 'Tables are finally turning on the Witch Hunt!' Warren unveils plan to cancel student loan debt, create universal free college Moulton enters 2020 White House race MORE (D-Mass.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisWarren unveils plan to cancel student loan debt, create universal free college Moulton enters 2020 White House race The Hill's Morning Report - Is impeachment back on the table? MORE (D-Calif.) and Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerWarren unveils plan to cancel student loan debt, create universal free college The Hill's Morning Report - Is impeachment back on the table? Booker: Barr's suggestion of spying on Trump campaign 'eroded' public's trust MORE (D-N.J.), represent coastal states.

South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D) has made his ties to the Midwest a central part of his presidential campaign that he announced recently.