Klobuchar says she will kick off campaign in Wisconsin, alludes to 2016 controversy

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharNewsom endorses Kamala Harris for president Pollster says current 2020 surveys like picking best picture Oscar before movies come out O’Rourke heading to Wisconsin amid 2020 speculation MORE (D-Minn.) announced on Sunday she was kicking off her campaign for president in Wisconsin, while making an apparent allusion to criticism over former Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonOvernight Defense: Trump declares border emergency | .6B in military construction funds to be used for wall | Trump believes Obama would have started war with North Korea | Pentagon delivers aid for Venezuelan migrants Sarah Sanders says she was interviewed by Mueller's office Trump: I believe Obama would have gone to war with North Korea MORE's decision not to visit the state extensively during the 2016 election.

"We're going to be in Iowa and in Wisconsin," Klobuchar said during her campaign unveiling in Minneapolis.

"I think we're starting in Wisconsin because as you remember there wasn't a lot of campaigning in Wisconsin in 2016. With me, that changes."

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Her comment comes as her party hopes to win back voters in the states of Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania, traditionally Democratic strongholds they lost to President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump nominates ambassador to Turkey Trump heads to Mar-a-Lago after signing bill to avert shutdown CNN, MSNBC to air ad turned down by Fox over Nazi imagery MORE in 2016. 

After winning the Democratic primary in April 2016, Clinton did not visit Wisconsin.

Trump on the other hand visited the state five times after the Republican convention in July 2016. He would go on to defeat Clinton by 47.2 percent to 46.5 percent in the state during the general election.

Clinton was criticized after Trump's victory for not focusing more of her campaign's energy on states like Wisconsin and Michigan, with some arguing her failure to do so cost her the election.

She addressed the Wisconsin loss in her 2017 book "What Happened." 

"If just 40,000 people across Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania had changed their minds, I would have won," Clinton wrote. "With a margin like that, everyone can have a pet theory about why I lost. It's difficult to rule anything out. But every theory needs to be tested against the evidence that I was winning until October 28, when [former FBI Director] Jim Comey injected emails back into the election."

Klobuchar did not mention Trump or Clinton by name in her campaign launch speech.

The Minnesota Democrat will also be visiting Iowa in the upcoming week, a sign that she is focusing on the midwest as her base, at least as of now.

Many of the other candidates who have announced their campaigns, like Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenNewsom endorses Kamala Harris for president Constitutional conservatives need to oppose the national emergency Poll: Sanders, Biden seen as most popular second choices in Dem primary MORE (D-Mass.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisNewsom endorses Kamala Harris for president Constitutional conservatives need to oppose the national emergency Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by America's 340B Hospitals — Dems blast rulemaking on family planning program | Facebook may remove anti-vaccine content | Medicare proposes coverage for new cancer treatment MORE (D-Calif.) and Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerNewsom endorses Kamala Harris for president Trump tweets video mocking Dems not cheering during State of the Union Former Virginia Gov McAuliffe writes book about confronting white nationalism MORE (D-N.J.), represent coastal states.

South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D) has made his ties to the Midwest a central part of his presidential campaign that he announced recently.