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Klobuchar will not take corporate PAC money for presidential campaign

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharDemocrats scramble to unify before election bill brawl Hillicon Valley: Big Tech critic Lina Khan named chair of the FTC | Lawmakers urge Biden to be tough on cyber during summit with Putin | TSA working on additional security regulations following Colonial Pipeline hack Big Tech critic Lina Khan named chair of the FTC MORE (D-Minn.) is rebuffing campaign contributions from corporate political action committees a day after declaring her bid for the White House.

Carlie Waibel, a spokesperson for Klobuchar’s campaign, said that the nascent presidential candidate will not accept money from corporate PACs, following the lead of other Democratic hopefuls.

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"The senator is not accepting contributions from corporate PACs during her campaign for president," Waibel said in a statement first reported by CNBC on Monday.

Klobuchar announced her candidacy for her party’s 2020 presidential nomination on Sunday at an event in her home state of Minnesota, making her the latest Democrat to throw their name into the rapidly growing primary field.

That announcement came a day after one of Klobuchar’s fellow senators, Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenCentrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting Democrats have turned solidly against gas tax Overnight Health Care: Takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision | COVID-19 cost 5.5 million years of American life | Biden administration investing billions in antiviral pills for COVID-19 MORE (D-Mass.), made her candidacy official during a kick-off event in Massachusetts.

Warren has also pledged not to take corporate PAC contributions to her campaign.

Among the other candidates to publicly reject corporate PAC money are former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro and Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandGillibrand: Military must make changes beyond sexual assault cases COVID-19 long-haulers press Congress for paid family leave Ocasio-Cortez, Gillibrand and Moulton call for more high-speed rail funding in infrastructure package MORE (D-N.Y.). Another 2020 contender, Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisThe U.S. and Mexico must revamp institutions supporting their joint efforts Harris signals a potential breakthrough in US-Mexico cooperation Watch live: Harris delivers remarks on vaccination efforts MORE (D-Calif.), said last year that she would no longer accept donations from such PACs.

The decision by several candidates to divest from corporate PAC contributions reflects growing opposition to big-dollar donations among the Democratic Party’s voter base.

At the same time, candidates are relying increasingly on small-dollar contributions facilitated by ActBlue, the Democratic Party’s online fundraising platform.