Klobuchar will not take corporate PAC money for presidential campaign

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharStudent slams Klobuchar for trying to classify pizza sauce as vegetable Pete Buttigieg: 'God doesn't have a political party' The Hill's Morning Report - Dem candidates sell policy as smart politics MORE (D-Minn.) is rebuffing campaign contributions from corporate political action committees a day after declaring her bid for the White House.

Carlie Waibel, a spokesperson for Klobuchar’s campaign, said that the nascent presidential candidate will not accept money from corporate PACs, following the lead of other Democratic hopefuls.

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"The senator is not accepting contributions from corporate PACs during her campaign for president," Waibel said in a statement first reported by CNBC on Monday.

Klobuchar announced her candidacy for her party’s 2020 presidential nomination on Sunday at an event in her home state of Minnesota, making her the latest Democrat to throw their name into the rapidly growing primary field.

That announcement came a day after one of Klobuchar’s fellow senators, Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenJulián Castro: Trump should be impeached for trying to obstruct justice 'in very concrete ways' Poll: Biden tops Sanders nationally Pete Buttigieg: 'God doesn't have a political party' MORE (D-Mass.), made her candidacy official during a kick-off event in Massachusetts.

Warren has also pledged not to take corporate PAC contributions to her campaign.

Among the other candidates to publicly reject corporate PAC money are former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro and Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandGillibrand pledges not to use 'stolen hacked' materials in 2020 campaign 2020 Dems rebuke Trump on Iran, say they'd put US back in nuclear deal Where 2020 Democratic candidates stand on impeachment MORE (D-N.Y.). Another 2020 contender, Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisJulián Castro: Trump should be impeached for trying to obstruct justice 'in very concrete ways' Poll: Buttigieg tops Harris, O'Rourke as momentum builds Trump Jr. slams 2020 Dems as 'more concerned' about rights of murderers than legal gun owners MORE (D-Calif.), said last year that she would no longer accept donations from such PACs.

The decision by several candidates to divest from corporate PAC contributions reflects growing opposition to big-dollar donations among the Democratic Party’s voter base.

At the same time, candidates are relying increasingly on small-dollar contributions facilitated by ActBlue, the Democratic Party’s online fundraising platform.