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Klobuchar will not take corporate PAC money for presidential campaign

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharDemocrats seek answers on impact of Russian cyberattack on Justice Department, Courts A Day in Photos: The Biden Inauguration Senators vet Buttigieg to run Transportation Department MORE (D-Minn.) is rebuffing campaign contributions from corporate political action committees a day after declaring her bid for the White House.

Carlie Waibel, a spokesperson for Klobuchar’s campaign, said that the nascent presidential candidate will not accept money from corporate PACs, following the lead of other Democratic hopefuls.

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"The senator is not accepting contributions from corporate PACs during her campaign for president," Waibel said in a statement first reported by CNBC on Monday.

Klobuchar announced her candidacy for her party’s 2020 presidential nomination on Sunday at an event in her home state of Minnesota, making her the latest Democrat to throw their name into the rapidly growing primary field.

That announcement came a day after one of Klobuchar’s fellow senators, Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden's Interior Department temporarily blocks new drilling on public lands | Group of GOP senators seeks to block Biden moves on Paris, Keystone | Judge grants preliminary approval for 0M Flint water crisis settlement Senate approves waiver for Biden's Pentagon nominee House approves waiver for Biden's Pentagon nominee MORE (D-Mass.), made her candidacy official during a kick-off event in Massachusetts.

Warren has also pledged not to take corporate PAC contributions to her campaign.

Among the other candidates to publicly reject corporate PAC money are former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro and Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandDemocrats torn on impeachment trial timing OVERNIGHT DEFENSE: 12 removed from National Guard inauguration security | Austin backs lifting transgender ban Biden Pentagon pick supports lifting transgender military ban MORE (D-N.Y.). Another 2020 contender, Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisSenators introduce bill to award Officer Goodman the Congressional Gold Medal An ally in the White House is good for abortion access, but not enough LeBron James says 'it would be great' for champion Lakers to visit Biden White House MORE (D-Calif.), said last year that she would no longer accept donations from such PACs.

The decision by several candidates to divest from corporate PAC contributions reflects growing opposition to big-dollar donations among the Democratic Party’s voter base.

At the same time, candidates are relying increasingly on small-dollar contributions facilitated by ActBlue, the Democratic Party’s online fundraising platform.