Klobuchar will not take corporate PAC money for presidential campaign

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharSenate Democrats demand answers on migrant child trafficking during pandemic Senate Democrats push to include free phone calls for incarcerated people in next relief package Lobbying world MORE (D-Minn.) is rebuffing campaign contributions from corporate political action committees a day after declaring her bid for the White House.

Carlie Waibel, a spokesperson for Klobuchar’s campaign, said that the nascent presidential candidate will not accept money from corporate PACs, following the lead of other Democratic hopefuls.

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"The senator is not accepting contributions from corporate PACs during her campaign for president," Waibel said in a statement first reported by CNBC on Monday.

Klobuchar announced her candidacy for her party’s 2020 presidential nomination on Sunday at an event in her home state of Minnesota, making her the latest Democrat to throw their name into the rapidly growing primary field.

That announcement came a day after one of Klobuchar’s fellow senators, Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenDemocratic convention lineup to include Ocasio-Cortez, Clinton, Warren: reports Whitmer met with Biden days before VP announcement: report The Hill's Campaign Report: US officials say Russia, China are looking to sow discord in election MORE (D-Mass.), made her candidacy official during a kick-off event in Massachusetts.

Warren has also pledged not to take corporate PAC contributions to her campaign.

Among the other candidates to publicly reject corporate PAC money are former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro and Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandExpanding our health force can save lives and create jobs simultaneously Sanders offers bill to tax billionaires' wealth gains during pandemic Senate Democrats demand answers on migrant child trafficking during pandemic MORE (D-N.Y.). Another 2020 contender, Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisDemocratic convention lineup to include Ocasio-Cortez, Clinton, Warren: reports Whitmer met with Biden days before VP announcement: report Maxine Waters says Biden 'can't go home without a Black woman being VP' MORE (D-Calif.), said last year that she would no longer accept donations from such PACs.

The decision by several candidates to divest from corporate PAC contributions reflects growing opposition to big-dollar donations among the Democratic Party’s voter base.

At the same time, candidates are relying increasingly on small-dollar contributions facilitated by ActBlue, the Democratic Party’s online fundraising platform.