Klobuchar on Green New Deal: ‘I see it as aspirational’

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharSanders opens up 15-point lead in New Hampshire: Poll Poll: 56 percent of Democrats say billionaire politicians more likely to cater to special interests Support for Biden, Sanders ticks up nationally: poll MORE (D-Minn.) said Tuesday evening that she views the recently proposed "Green New Deal" as “aspirational,” but was less committal about specific legislative proposals.

“I see it as aspirational, I see it as a jump-start. So I would vote yes, but I would also, if it got down to the nitty-gritty of an actual legislation as opposed to, ‘oh, here are some goals we have,’ that would be different for me,” the Democratic presidential candidate said during an interview with Fox News's Bret Baier.

“I am for a jump-start of the discussion and a framework as Sen. [Ed] Markey [D-Mass.] has described,” she added.

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Markey and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezBiden lines up high-profile surrogates to campaign in Iowa New economic confidence polls show why Bernie won't win the White House Ocasio-Cortez rips 'public charge' decision: 'The American Dream isn't a private club with a cover charge' MORE (D-N.Y.) introduced companion resolutions on the Green New Deal last week. The nonbinding measures have a goal of creating millions of “good, high-wage jobs” by working toward net-zero greenhouse gas emissions.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump allies throw jabs at Bolton over book's claims GOP confident of win on witnesses Collins Senate bid threatens to spark GOP rift in Georgia MORE (R-Ky.) announced Tuesday that the Senate would hold a vote on Green New Deal legislation, an effort to put undeclared Democrats on the record about the proposal from the party's progressive wing.

Several Democratic senators who have announced White House bids have already backed the idea of a Green New Deal, including Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenBiden on whether Sanders can unify party as nominee: 'It depends' Overnight Health Care — Presented by Philip Morris International — HHS has no plans to declare emergency over coronavirus | GOP senator calls for travel ban to stop outbreak | Warren releases plan to contain infectious diseases Biden lines up high-profile surrogates to campaign in Iowa MORE (Mass.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerOvernight Defense: White House threatens to veto House Iran bills | Dems 'frustrated' after Iran briefing | Lawmakers warn US, UK intel sharing at risk after Huawei decision White House Correspondents' Association blasts State for 'punitive action' against NPR Senate Democrat demands State Department reinstate NPR reporter on Pompeo trip MORE (N.J.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisSanders allies in new uproar over DNC convention appointments Biden leads 2020 pack in congressional endorsements Harris on 2020 endorsement: 'I am not thinking about it right now' MORE (Calif.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandIt's time for paid leave for all GOP-Biden feud looms over impeachment trial Sanders defends vote against USMCA: 'Not a single damn mention' of climate change MORE (N.Y.).

“For us to do nothing and go backwards is wrong. So I view this as a framework for discussion,” Klobuchar said Tuesday on Fox. “We just need to start as a country seeing it as aspiration to do better than we’re doing now.” 

While many of the Democratic candidates who have announced presidential bids so far appear to be angling their appeal to the party’s progressive wing, Klobuchar is seeking a more center-left approach that leverages on her “Minnesota nice” reputation as a contrast to President TrumpDonald John TrumpCNN's Don Lemon explains handling of segment after Trump criticism NPR reporter after Pompeo clash: Journalists don't interview government officials to score 'political points' Lawyer says Parnas can't attend Senate trial due to ankle bracelet MORE.