DNC punts on measure to reduce role of corporate PAC money

DNC punts on measure to reduce role of corporate PAC money
© Greg Nash

The Democratic National Committee (DNC) has punted on a resolution that would have created a task force to reduce the role of corporate PACs in party fundraising.

At a general meeting of DNC members in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, party officials said that they would instead refer the matter to the party's Platform Committee in 2020, giving the Democratic National Convention final say on the measure next year.

The measure referred by members would have required DNC Chairman Tom PerezThomas PerezClinton’s top five vice presidential picks Government social programs: Triumph of hope over evidence Labor’s 'wasteful spending and mismanagement” at Workers’ Comp MORE to establish a task force to study corporate PAC money in party fundraising within 60 days of the DNC’s winter meeting this week.

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While the resolution had the backing of top DNC officials, including Perez, the issue of corporate money in party fundraising has been a point of contention among Democrats for some time.

Former President Obama introduced a ban on corporate PAC money as a candidate in 2008. The DNC removed that ban in 2016 amid a contentious Democratic primary that brought the issue of special interests and corporate campaign contributions front and center.

Some members have called for a complete ban on corporate PAC money in Democratic politics. But other Democrats say that banning such contributions would essentially tie the party’s hands in its push to defeat President TrumpDonald TrumpMajority of Americans in new poll say it would be bad for the country if Trump ran in 2024 ,800 bottle of whiskey given to Pompeo by Japan is missing Liz Cheney says her father is 'deeply troubled' about the state of the Republican Party MORE in 2020.

A growing number of Democratic candidates up and down the ballot have rejected corporate PAC contributions to their campaigns in recent years.

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenHillicon Valley: Senators highlight security threats from China during rare public hearing | Facebook suspends accounts of NYU researchers who've criticized platform Democrats urge Amazon, Facebook to drop requests for Khan recusal Senate Democrats to introduce measure taxing major polluters MORE (D-Mass.), who’s seeking the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination, said last month that she would not take campaign money from corporate PACs and urged her Democratic challengers to do the same.

Since then, several presidential hopefuls, including former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro and Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardTulsi Gabbard on Chicago mayor's decision to limit media interviews to people of color: 'Anti-white racism' Fox News says network and anchor Leland Vittert have 'parted ways' New co-chairs named for congressional caucus for millennials MORE (D-Hawaii), have pledged to reject money from such groups.