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Bernie Sanders records announcement video ahead of possible 2020 bid

Bernie Sanders records announcement video ahead of possible 2020 bid
© Stefani Reynolds

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersIntercept bureau chief says congressional progressives looking to become stronger force in 2021 Obama book excerpt: 'Hard to deny my overconfidence' during early health care discussions Americans have a choice: Socialized medicine or health care freedom MORE (I-Vt.) has reportedly recorded a presidential announcement video, signaling that the progressive firebrand is closing in on a second White House bid.

News of the announcement video was first reported Saturday by Politico, though it is unclear when — or even whether — Sanders will release the spot. That the Vermont senator has already recorded a video suggests that an announcement could come soon.

Sanders, who mounted an insurgent challenge to Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGorsuch rejects Minnesota Republican's request to delay House race Biden leads Trump by 6 points in Nevada: poll The Memo: Women could cost Trump reelection MORE for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2016, has been laying the groundwork for a 2020 campaign for months.

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Sanders’s anticipated entrance into the presidential race would throw a progressive lawmaker with a loyal base of supporters into an already crowded Democratic primary field that is shaping up to be the largest and most diverse in the party’s history.

But Sanders's candidacy would likely add fuel to an already heated debate over what kind of candidate the Democratic Party should pit against President TrumpDonald John TrumpGiuliani goes off on Fox Business host after she compares him to Christopher Steele Trump looks to shore up support in Nebraska NYT: Trump had 7 million in debt mostly tied to Chicago project forgiven MORE in 2020.

Some Democrats say that the party should put forward a candidate more reflective of an increasingly diverse Democratic electorate. Sanders's backers, however, argue that the Vermont senator’s populist economic message could resonate with many of the white working-class voters that sent Trump to the White House in 2016.