Warren, Harris back reparations for black Americans affected by slavery

Democratic Sens. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: Dybul interview; Boris Johnson update Biden hosts potential VP pick Gretchen Whitmer on podcast Why Gretchen Whitmer's stock is rising with Team Biden MORE (Calif.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOn The Money: Trump officials struggle to get relief loans out the door | Dow soars more than 1600 points | Kudlow says officials 'looking at' offering coronavirus bonds Overnight Energy: Trump floats oil tariffs amid Russia-Saudi dispute | Warren knocks EPA over 'highly dangerous' enforcement rollback | 2019 sees big increase in methane levels in air Ex-CFPB director urges agency to 'act immediately' to help consumers during pandemic MORE (Mass.), who are both running for president, have reportedly said they support reparations for black Americans affected by slavery.

The New York Times reported Thursday that Harris affirmed her support for reparations in a statement after agreeing last week with a radio host that reparations are necessary.

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"We have to be honest that people in this country do not start from the same place or have access to the same opportunities," Harris said in the statement. "I’m serious about taking an approach that would change policies and structures and make real investments in black communities."

Warren has also said she supports reparations, according to the Times, though her campaign declined to provide further details to the newspaper.

The Hill has reached out to both campaigns for comment.

Warren and Harris are both pursuing the Democratic nomination for president in 2020 and the Times noted that previous Democratic presidential candidates have not supported reparations.

Among those who have not backed the policy are former President Obama, 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonWe need to be 'One America,' the polling says — and the politicians should listen Poll shows Biden with 6-point edge on Trump in Florida Does Joe Biden really want to be president? MORE and her Democratic rival that year, Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersWisconsin Supreme Court blocks governor's effort to delay election The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden, Trump discuss coronavirus response; Wisconsin postpones elections Wisconsin governor postpones Tuesday's election over coronavirus MORE (I-Vt.), the Times noted. Sanders is running for president again in 2020.

Supporters have said the policy is necessary to address slavery and other racist parts of U.S. history. Such a move could cost several trillion dollars, according to experts.