Harry Reid says he won’t make 2020 endorsement until after Nevada caucus

Former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) said Thursday that he will not endorse a candidate in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary until after the Nevada caucus.

Reid made the comments in an interview with the Nevada Independent about Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersRussian interference reports rock Capitol Hill The Democratic nominee won't be democratically chosen Fox's Ingraham mocks DNC over Nevada voting malfunctions: 'Are we a Third World country?' MORE (I-Vt.) hiring three of Reid's former staff for his presidential campaign.

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“All these people working for Bernie, I’m glad,” Reid said. “Bernie is one of my friends. He helped me get Obamacare passed. His vote was crucial. So I think the world of him.”

Faiz Shakir, a senior Reid adviser, is now Sanders's campaign manager.

The Vermont lawmaker is not the only presidential hopeful who employs his former staff to receive praise from Reid.

Reid’s former communications director, Kristen Orthman, is working for Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenThe Democratic nominee won't be democratically chosen Surging Sanders looks for decisive win in Nevada Bloomberg to do interview with Al Sharpton MORE's (D-Mass.) campaign.

The former Nevada senator praised Warren earlier this month, saying he thinks "the world of her," but did not endorse her.

Reid told the Independent he isn’t bothered by seeing his former staffers on competing campaigns.

“I think it’s good that people recognize talent,” he said.

Reid has also reportedly talked to former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenThe Democratic nominee won't be democratically chosen Fox's Ingraham mocks DNC over Nevada voting malfunctions: 'Are we a Third World country?' At Democratic debate, missed opportunities on immigration MORE and Sens. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharThe Democratic nominee won't be democratically chosen At Democratic debate, missed opportunities on immigration Surging Sanders looks for decisive win in Nevada MORE (D-Minn.), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandNow is the time for a US data protection agency The Hill's Campaign Report: Warren up, Bloomberg down after brutal debate Ginsburg, accepting lifetime achievement award, urges working fathers to take an active role in kids' lives MORE (D-N.Y.) and Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownTrump pick for Fed seat takes bipartisan fire On The Money: Deficit spikes 25 percent through January | Mnuchin declines to say why Trump pulled Treasury nominee who oversaw Roger Stone case | Lawmakers trade insults over Trump budget cuts Mnuchin defends Treasury regulations on GOP tax law MORE (D-Ohio) about potentially running for president.

Klobuchar and Gillibrand have already announced their candidacies.

“There is not a single Democrat that I have seen that’s interested that I wouldn’t do everything I could to help,” Reid said.

“Michael Bloomberg — and I think he could be really good for the party — I think he’s going to be here in the next few days. I just think, I’m glad that a lot of people are running and I’m excited about what it’s going to do to generate attention around the country.”

Bloomberg, the former New York City Mayor, has not yet decided whether or not to pursue the Democratic nomination.