Sanders on whether he'd seek advice from Clinton: 'I think not'

Sanders on whether he'd seek advice from Clinton: 'I think not'
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Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSanders, Manchin escalate fight over .5T spending bill Sanders blames media for Americans not knowing details of Biden spending plan Briahna Joy Gray: Proposals favored by Black voters 'first at the chopping block' in spending talks MORE (I-Vt.) said Friday on "The View" that he will not be asking for campaign advice from former Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump criticizes Justice for restoring McCabe's benefits Biden sends 'best wishes' to Clinton following hospitalization The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Altria - Jan. 6 panel flexes its muscle MORE.

When asked whether he would seek the counsel of Clinton, who in 2016 beat him to the presidential nomination, Sanders said, "I think not."

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"Hillary and I have fundamental ... differences," he said. 

Sanders added that regardless of who wins the nomination, he hopes all Democrats will come together to try to defeat President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump criticizes Justice for restoring McCabe's benefits Biden: Those who defy Jan. 6 subpoenas should be prosecuted Hillicon Valley — Presented by LookingGlass — Hackers are making big money MORE in the general election.

"I hope to be the Democratic nominee and have the support of the whole Democratic Party behind me," he said. "If I am not and somebody else is, I will support that candidate because what's most important is that Trump be defeated," he said. 

The democratic socialist announced last month that he would again seek the nomination to take on Trump.

Sanders is one of the front-runners in a large group that is hoping for the nomination. Also running are Democratic Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenMisguided recusal rules lock valuable leaders out of the Pentagon Biden's soft touch with Manchin, Sinema frustrates Democrats Hillicon Valley — Presented by LookingGlass — Congress makes technology policy moves MORE (Mass.), Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisDemocrats' reconciliation bill breaks Biden's middle class tax pledge We have a presidential leadership crisis — and it's only going to get worse Blinken pressed to fill empty post overseeing 'Havana syndrome' MORE (Calif.), Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharOn The Money — Progressives play hard ball on Biden budget plan Schumer, McConnell headed for another collision over voting rights Hillicon Valley — Presented by LookingGlass — Congress makes technology policy moves MORE (Minn.) and Cory BookerCory BookerDefense & National Security — Military starts giving guidance on COVID-19 vaccine refusals Senators preview bill to stop tech giants from prioritizing their own products Blinken pressed to fill empty post overseeing 'Havana syndrome' MORE (N.J.) as well as former Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro, South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg and Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, who announced his campaign Friday.

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenJill Biden campaigns for McAuliffe in Virginia Fill the Eastern District of Virginia  Biden: Those who defy Jan. 6 subpoenas should be prosecuted MORE, former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeAbbott bans vaccine mandates from any 'entity in Texas' Abbott disapproval rating up 8 points to 59 percent in San Antonio area: poll Beto O'Rourke weighs in on Matthew McConaughey's potential Texas bid MORE (D-Texas) and Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownBuilding back better by investing in workers and communities US on track to miss debt payments as soon as Oct. 19: analysis On The Money — Presented by NRHC — Democrats cross the debt ceiling Rubicon MORE (D-Ohio) are all said to be weighing 2020 White House bids.

Sanders is the favorite in New Hampshire, an early primary state that helps set the course for future contests, according to a poll published Thursday.