Sanders on whether he'd seek advice from Clinton: 'I think not'

Sanders on whether he'd seek advice from Clinton: 'I think not'
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Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersDemocratic strategist: 'Medicare for All' exposes generational gap within party Yang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations Biden: All-white debate not representative of party, but 'you can't dictate' nominee MORE (I-Vt.) said Friday on "The View" that he will not be asking for campaign advice from former Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonYang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations Top GOP legislator in California leaves party GOP senators request interview with former DNC contractor to probe possible Ukraine ties MORE.

When asked whether he would seek the counsel of Clinton, who in 2016 beat him to the presidential nomination, Sanders said, "I think not."

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"Hillary and I have fundamental ... differences," he said. 

Sanders added that regardless of who wins the nomination, he hopes all Democrats will come together to try to defeat President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump says he will 'temporarily hold off' on declaring Mexican drug cartels as terror organization House Judiciary Committee formally receives impeachment report Artist behind gold toilet offered to Trump sells banana duct-taped to a wall for 0,000 MORE in the general election.

"I hope to be the Democratic nominee and have the support of the whole Democratic Party behind me," he said. "If I am not and somebody else is, I will support that candidate because what's most important is that Trump be defeated," he said. 

The democratic socialist announced last month that he would again seek the nomination to take on Trump.

Sanders is one of the front-runners in a large group that is hoping for the nomination. Also running are Democratic Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenArtist behind gold toilet offered to Trump sells banana duct-taped to a wall for 0,000 Democratic strategist: 'Medicare for All' exposes generational gap within party Yang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations MORE (Mass.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisYang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations Biden: All-white debate not representative of party, but 'you can't dictate' nominee Delaney to DNC: Open second debate stage for candidates who qualified for past events MORE (Calif.), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharBiden: All-white debate not representative of party, but 'you can't dictate' nominee Delaney to DNC: Open second debate stage for candidates who qualified for past events There's a lot to like about the Senate privacy bill, if it's not watered down MORE (Minn.) and Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerBloomberg apologizes after critics say his calling Booker 'well spoken' was racist Biden: All-white debate not representative of party, but 'you can't dictate' nominee Booker unveils legislation for federal bill to ban discrimination against natural hair MORE (N.J.) as well as former Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro, South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg and Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, who announced his campaign Friday.

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenHouse Judiciary Committee formally receives impeachment report Democratic strategist: 'Medicare for All' exposes generational gap within party Yang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations MORE, former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeButtigieg picks up third congressional endorsement from New York lawmaker Klobuchar hires staff in Nevada Deval Patrick enters 2020 race MORE (D-Texas) and Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownBoth sides have reason to want speedy Trump impeachment trial Lawmakers battle over future of Ex-Im Bank Hillicon Valley: Senate Dems unveil privacy bill | Trump campaign, RNC rip Google political ad policy | Activists form national coalition to take on Amazon | Commerce issues rule to secure communications supply chain MORE (D-Ohio) are all said to be weighing 2020 White House bids.

Sanders is the favorite in New Hampshire, an early primary state that helps set the course for future contests, according to a poll published Thursday.