2020 Dem front-runners not seeking Bill Clinton advice: report

2020 Dem front-runners not seeking Bill Clinton advice: report
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Front-runners for the 2020 Democratic nomination for president so far have not sought advice from former President Clinton, according to an Associated Press report Monday.

So far, the 72-year-old former president has had formal meetings with long shots for the nomination like Montana Gov. Steve Bullock (D), former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro and former Rep. John DelaneyJohn Kevin DelaneyInslee unveils plan to fight fossil fuel pollution 2020 primary debate guide: Everything you need to know ahead of the first Democratic showdown Young activists press for change in 2020 election MORE (D-Md.) and has not met with any of the women in the diverse Democratic primary field.

Shifts within the party and personal baggage have reportedly made him an awkward adviser for Democratic hopefuls.

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Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill's Morning Report - Crunch time arrives for 2020 Dems with debates on deck The Memo: All eyes on faltering Biden ahead of first debate Progressive group launches campaign to identify voters who switch to Warren MORE (I-Vt.) in particular has a fraught relationship with the former president after his contentious 2016 Democratic primary against Clinton's wife, former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThe Hill's Morning Report - Crunch time arrives for 2020 Dems with debates on deck The Memo: All eyes on faltering Biden ahead of first debate Trump says he's not prepared to lose in 2020 MORE.

The Clintons reportedly do not believe Sanders could defeat President TrumpDonald John TrumpConway defends herself against Hatch Act allegations amid threat of subpoena How to defuse Gulf tensions and avoid war with Iran Trump says 'stubborn child' Fed 'blew it' by not cutting rates MORE in the general election, according to people who have spoken with them.

“I think that at some point bygones can be bygones, but what you can’t get around is the electability question,” longtime Clinton ally David Brock told the AP.

On Friday, Sanders addressed his relationship with Hillary Clinton in an appearance on “The View,” saying that he would not be asking for campaign advice from the former Democratic nominee.

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandJuan Williams: Warren on the rise 2020 primary debate guide: Everything you need to know ahead of the first Democratic showdown 2020 Democrats vow to expand abortion access at Planned Parenthood event MORE (D-N.Y.) has said that President Clinton should have resigned the presidency due to his affair with then-White House intern Monica Lewinsky. Clinton tried to brush off the senator's comments last May by saying Gillibrand is “living in a different context,” per the AP.

Other women running, including Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann Warren2020 Democrat: 'My DM's are open and I actually read & respond' Group of wealthy Americans write open letter asking to be taxed more Inslee unveils plan to fight fossil fuel pollution MORE (D-Mass.) and Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisThe Hill's Morning Report - Crunch time arrives for 2020 Dems with debates on deck The Memo: All eyes on faltering Biden ahead of first debate 2020 primary debate guide: Everything you need to know ahead of the first Democratic showdown MORE (D-Calif.), have not met with Clinton.

Clinton spokesperson Angel Ureña confirmed to The Hill that the former president has spoken to a number of candidates who have declared or are considering a run. He did not comment on who Clinton specifically has met with.

Updated at 9:05 a.m.