2020 Dem front-runners not seeking Bill Clinton advice: report

2020 Dem front-runners not seeking Bill Clinton advice: report
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Front-runners for the 2020 Democratic nomination for president so far have not sought advice from former President Clinton, according to an Associated Press report Monday.

So far, the 72-year-old former president has had formal meetings with long shots for the nomination like Montana Gov. Steve Bullock (D), former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro and former Rep. John DelaneyJohn Kevin DelaneyElizabeth Warren moves 'bigly' to out-trump Trump DNC goof: Bloomberg should be on debate stage Bloomberg decides to skip Nevada caucuses MORE (D-Md.) and has not met with any of the women in the diverse Democratic primary field.

Shifts within the party and personal baggage have reportedly made him an awkward adviser for Democratic hopefuls.

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Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden alleges Sanders campaign 'doctored video' to attack him on Social Security record Sanders campaign responds to Biden doctored video claims: Biden should 'stop trying to doctor' public record The Memo: Sanders-Warren battle could reshape Democratic primary MORE (I-Vt.) in particular has a fraught relationship with the former president after his contentious 2016 Democratic primary against Clinton's wife, former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham Clinton Democrats plot new approach to win over rural voters The Memo: Sanders-Warren battle could reshape Democratic primary Rosenstein says he authorized release of Strzok-Page texts MORE.

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“I think that at some point bygones can be bygones, but what you can’t get around is the electability question,” longtime Clinton ally David Brock told the AP.

On Friday, Sanders addressed his relationship with Hillary Clinton in an appearance on “The View,” saying that he would not be asking for campaign advice from the former Democratic nominee.

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandSanders defends vote against USMCA: 'Not a single damn mention' of climate change The Hill's Morning Report — President Trump on trial Overnight Energy: Schumer votes against USMCA, citing climate impact | Republicans offer details on their environmental proposals | Microsoft aims to be carbon negative by 2030 MORE (D-N.Y.) has said that President Clinton should have resigned the presidency due to his affair with then-White House intern Monica Lewinsky. Clinton tried to brush off the senator's comments last May by saying Gillibrand is “living in a different context,” per the AP.

Other women running, including Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenThe Memo: Sanders-Warren battle could reshape Democratic primary Environmental activists interrupt Buttigieg in New Hampshire Pence to visit Iowa days before caucuses MORE (D-Mass.) and Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisParnas pressure grows on Senate GOP Sanders defends vote against USMCA: 'Not a single damn mention' of climate change The Hill's Morning Report — President Trump on trial MORE (D-Calif.), have not met with Clinton.

Clinton spokesperson Angel Ureña confirmed to The Hill that the former president has spoken to a number of candidates who have declared or are considering a run. He did not comment on who Clinton specifically has met with.

Updated at 9:05 a.m.