2020 Dem front-runners not seeking Bill Clinton advice: report

2020 Dem front-runners not seeking Bill Clinton advice: report
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Front-runners for the 2020 Democratic nomination for president so far have not sought advice from former President Clinton, according to an Associated Press report Monday.

So far, the 72-year-old former president has had formal meetings with long shots for the nomination like Montana Gov. Steve Bullock (D), former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro and former Rep. John DelaneyJohn Kevin DelaneyTrump campaign mocks Democratic debate: 'Another informercial for President Trump' The Hill's 12:30 Report: House panel approves impeachment powers Sanders slips in NH, Biden and Warren in statistical dead heat MORE (D-Md.) and has not met with any of the women in the diverse Democratic primary field.

Shifts within the party and personal baggage have reportedly made him an awkward adviser for Democratic hopefuls.

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Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersGun control: Campaigning vs. legislating Booker defends middle-ground health care approach: 'We're going to fight to get there' Sunday shows preview: Democratic candidates make the rounds after debate MORE (I-Vt.) in particular has a fraught relationship with the former president after his contentious 2016 Democratic primary against Clinton's wife, former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonDershowitz: 'Too many politicians are being subject to criminal prosecution' The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation Democrats spar over electoral appeal of 'Medicare for All' MORE.

The Clintons reportedly do not believe Sanders could defeat President TrumpDonald John TrumpHarris bashes Kavanaugh's 'sham' nomination process, calls for his impeachment after sexual misconduct allegation Celebrating 'Hispanic Heritage Month' in the Age of Trump Let's not play Charlie Brown to Iran's Lucy MORE in the general election, according to people who have spoken with them.

“I think that at some point bygones can be bygones, but what you can’t get around is the electability question,” longtime Clinton ally David Brock told the AP.

On Friday, Sanders addressed his relationship with Hillary Clinton in an appearance on “The View,” saying that he would not be asking for campaign advice from the former Democratic nominee.

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandAt debate, Warren and Buttigieg tap idealism of Obama, FDR Trump court pick sparks frustration for refusing to answer questions Klobuchar, Buttigieg find themselves accidentally flying to debate together MORE (D-N.Y.) has said that President Clinton should have resigned the presidency due to his affair with then-White House intern Monica Lewinsky. Clinton tried to brush off the senator's comments last May by saying Gillibrand is “living in a different context,” per the AP.

Other women running, including Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenGun control: Campaigning vs. legislating Booker defends middle-ground health care approach: 'We're going to fight to get there' Democrats spar over electoral appeal of 'Medicare for All' MORE (D-Mass.) and Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisHarris bashes Kavanaugh's 'sham' nomination process, calls for his impeachment after sexual misconduct allegation Gun control: Campaigning vs. legislating Booker defends middle-ground health care approach: 'We're going to fight to get there' MORE (D-Calif.), have not met with Clinton.

Clinton spokesperson Angel Ureña confirmed to The Hill that the former president has spoken to a number of candidates who have declared or are considering a run. He did not comment on who Clinton specifically has met with.

Updated at 9:05 a.m.