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Radio host asks Bernie Sanders if country needs more 'white men' as president

Radio host asks Bernie Sanders if country needs more 'white men' as president
© Stefani Reynolds

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersObama book excerpt: 'Hard to deny my overconfidence' during early health care discussions Americans have a choice: Socialized medicine or health care freedom Ocasio-Cortez says Democrats must focus on winning White House for Biden MORE (I-Vt.), who is running for president, was asked if the country needs another white president during a radio interview on Monday. 

“So, Bernie, 44 out of 45 presidents in this country have been white men. Do you think we need another one?” host Charlamagne Tha God asked as his first question to Sanders on "The Breakfast Club," a morning-drive program on Power 105.1 in New York City. 
 
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“Well, I think you need this one," Sanders responded. "Look, we are living in an unprecedented time. We have the most dangerous president in the modern history of this country, somebody who is a pathological liar, a fraud, a racist, a sexist, a homophobe. ...
 
"You know, this is a bad news guy. The most important thing that has got to happen is that this dangerous president is defeated. I’m going to do everything I can to defeat him. I look forward to winning the Democratic nomination. And if I don’t I will support anybody else who’s out there to defeat him, but this guy cannot win another term.”

Sanders was also asked about his position on reparations, which several other Democratic presidential candidates, including Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisHarris blasts GOP for confirming Amy Coney Barrett: 'We won't forget this' GOP Senate confirms Trump Supreme Court pick to succeed Ginsburg The painstaking, state-by-state fight to protect abortion access MORE (Calif.), have voiced support for though they have not issued a specific proposal. 

“What do we mean by reparations?” Sanders asked. “To my mind, it means we have to deal with the fact that there is enormous disparity between the black community and the white community. And that issue has got to be addressed.”

“I think they mean some type of economic empowerment to the African-American community,” Charlamagne said. 

“What does that mean, economic empowerment?” Sanders asked. “I would do my best to change the banking system so that we pay attention to distressed communities that people get the loans that they need, to make the investments they need.”

“Cash payouts?” Charlamagne asked. 

“No,” Sanders replied. “You mean just a check to every African-American? Well then there’s a check to every Native American … I think the way we go forward is we build America. There are distressed communities — white communities — distressed Latino communities.”
 
Sanders announced his entry into an already-crowded presidential race last month.