The 2020 candidates who are defending Omar

The 2020 candidates who are defending Omar
© Greg Nash

Presidential candidates on Wednesday defended Rep. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarTucker Carlson ratchets up criticism of Duckworth, calls her a 'coward' The Hill's Campaign Report: Colorado, Utah primary results bring upsets, intrigue Progressive lawmakers call for conditions on Israel aid MORE (D-Minn.) amid an avalanche of criticism over her comments slamming pro-Israel groups and politicians.

Omar drew criticism last week when she suggested pro-Israel groups are pushing members of Congress to have “allegiance to a foreign country.”  

The comments, widely condemned as anti-Semitic, set off a firestorm among lawmakers on Capitol Hill. 

Democrats are currently adjusting the language of a resolution intended to reprimand Omar for her comments and condemn a wider range of discrimination also faced by other groups.  

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Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersTammy Duckworth is the epitome of the American Dream On The Money: Deficit rises to record .7 trillion amid pandemic: CBO | Democrats sidestep budget deal by seeking 0B in emergency spending | House panel advances spending bill with funding boost to IRS Biden-Sanders unity task force calls for Fed, US Postal Service consumer banking MORE (I-Vt.), who is Jewish, expressed fear that a House resolution intended to rebuke Omar could hinder a larger conversation over U.S. support for Israel.

“Anti-Semitism is a hateful and dangerous ideology which must be vigorously opposed in the United States and around the world," he said in a statement to The Hill. "We must not, however, equate anti-Semitism with legitimate criticism of the right-wing, Netanyahu government in Israel. Rather, we must develop an even-handed Middle East policy which brings Israelis and Palestinians together for a lasting peace.”

“What I fear is going on in the House now is an effort to target Congresswoman Omar as a way of stifling that debate," he continued. “That's wrong.”

Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisDemocrats awash with cash in battle for Senate Tammy Duckworth hits back at Tucker Carlson: 'Walk a mile in my legs' The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Trump wants schools to reopen, challenged on 'harmless' COVID-19 remark MORE (D-Calif.) wrote in a statement obtained by HuffPost that continued attention directed at Omar, one of the first two Muslim women to serve in Congress, puts her at risk of possible violence.

“We all have a responsibility to speak out against anti-Semitism, Islamophobia, homophobia, transphobia, racism, and all forms of hatred and bigotry,” Harris said in a statement. “But like some of my colleagues in the Congressional Black Caucus, I am concerned that the spotlight being put on Congresswoman Omar may put her at risk.”

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenThe Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic Unity Taskforce unveils party platform recommendations Progressive activist Ady Barkan endorses Biden, urges him to pick Warren as VP Congress must act now to fix a Social Security COVID-19 glitch and expand, not cut, benefits MORE (D-Mass.) later condemned reported threats against Omar and pushed back on the notion that criticizing Israel is inherently anti-Semitic.

“We have a moral duty to combat hateful ideologies in our own country and around the world — and that includes both anti-Semitism and Islamophobia. In a democracy, we can and should have an open, respectful debate about the Middle East that focuses on policy,” Warren said in a statement to The Hill.

“Branding criticism of Israel as automatically anti-Semitic has a chilling effect on our public discourse and makes it harder to achieve a peaceful solution between Israelis and Palestinians," she said. "Threats of violence — like those made against Rep. Omar — are never acceptable.”

Omar first drew censure last month after she accused some members of Congress of supporting Israel as a result of funds from pro-Israel lobbying groups, saying it was “all about the Benjamins baby.” She later noted that the American Israel Public Affairs Committee donated to members of Congress who had criticized her comments.