O'Rourke strongly signals he's entering Dem primary in Vanity Fair interview

O'Rourke strongly signals he's entering Dem primary in Vanity Fair interview
© Vanity Fair

Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-Texas) strongly signaled that he is preparing to enter the Democratic 2020 presidential primary in a Vanity Fair interview released Wednesday. 

“I want to be in it,” O’Rourke said in the April cover story. “Man, I’m just born to be in it, and want to do everything I humanly can for this country at this moment.”

O’Rourke experienced a rise in popularity, which he referred to as "abnormal," following his narrow loss to Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzGianforte halts in-person campaigning after wife, running mate attend event with Guilfoyle Trump administration grants funding extension for Texas testing sites Hillicon Valley: Democrats introduce bill banning federal government use of facial recognition tech | House lawmakers roll out legislation to establish national cyber director | Top federal IT official to step down MORE (R) in the Texas Senate race in November. 

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He has since hedged about possible plans join a field of crowded Democratic contenders vying for a White House bid.

“You can probably tell that I want to run,” he told Vanity Fair. “I do. I think I’d be good at it.”

O’Rourke called the current political climate the “fight of our lives, not the fight-of-my-political life kind of crap.”

“But, like, this is the fight of our lives as Americans, and as humans, I’d argue,” the former congressman said.

He previously said that he and his wife, Amy, had not ruled any future campaigns. 

The progressive star told Vanity Fair that he’s not “as concerned” anymore about a presidential campaign having a negative impact on his family.

His 10-year-old daughter, Molly, said she wants to live in the White House. 

“I only want you to run if you’re gonna win,” his 12-year-old son, Ulysses, said. 

The three-term congressman acknowledged that his presidential run could face pushback in 2020. 

“The government at all levels is overly represented by white men,” he said. “That’s part of the problem, and I’m a white man.” 

O’Rourke vowed that surrounding himself with diverse advisers would be key. 

"So if I were to run, I think it’s just so important that those who would comprise my team looked like this country. If I were to run, if I were to win, that my administration looks like this country. It’s the only way I know to meet that challenge," O'Rourke said. 

“But I totally understand people who will make a decision based on the fact that almost every single one of our presidents has been a white man, and they want something different for this country,” he continued. “And I think that’s a very legitimate basis upon which to make a decision. Especially in the fact that there are some really great candidates out there right now.”

If he entered the race, O’Rourke would face off against a diverse field of candidates, including Sens. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisSusan Rice sees stock rise in Biden VP race Jaime Harrison seeks to convince Democrats he can take down Lindsey Graham Senators push foreign media to disclose if they are registered as foreign agents MORE (D-Calif.), Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Memo: Unhappy voters could deliver political shocks beyond Trump Democratic senator will introduce bill mandating social distancing on flights after flying on packed plane Neil Young opposes use of his music at Trump Mount Rushmore event: 'I stand in solidarity with the Lakota Sioux' MORE (I-Vt.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerSenators push foreign media to disclose if they are registered as foreign agents Joe Biden must release the results of his cognitive tests — voters need to know GOP senators debate replacing Columbus Day with Juneteenth as a federal holiday MORE (D-N.J.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenSusan Rice sees stock rise in Biden VP race The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden chips away at Trump's fundraising advantage Warnock raises almost M in Georgia Senate race in second quarter MORE (D-Mass.).

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump second-term plans remain a mystery to GOP Susan Rice: Trump picks Putin over troops 'even when it comes to the blood of American service members' Does Donald Trump even want a second term? MORE is also considering entering the field. 

“If I bring something to this,” he told Vanity Fair, “I think it is my ability to listen to people, to help bring people together to do something that is thought to be impossible,” O’Rourke said.

Updated at 5:55 p.m.