O'Rourke on impeachment: 2020 vote may be best way to 'resolve' Trump

O'Rourke on impeachment: 2020 vote may be best way to 'resolve' Trump
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Former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump digs in ahead of House vote to condemn tweet Poll: Biden, Sanders and Warren lead 2020 Democrats in New Hampshire Poll: Biden leads 2020 Democrats by 13 points, followed by Sanders, Warren and Harris MORE (D-Texas) on Thursday appeared to back away from his calls to impeach President TrumpDonald John TrumpPompeo changes staff for Russia meeting after concerns raised about top negotiator's ties: report House unravels with rise of 'Les Enfants Terrible' Ben Carson: Trump is not a racist and his comments were not racist MORE, pointing to the 2020 election as the best way to remove him from office.

In an interview with "CBS This Morning," the former Texas congressman, who announced his 2020 candidacy on Thursday, told Gayle King that the ballot box was "perhaps" the best place to take action against the president.

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It would be up to Congress, he added, to determine what the response to Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTop Republican considered Mueller subpoena to box in Democrats Kamala Harris says her Justice Dept would have 'no choice' but to prosecute Trump for obstruction Dem committees win new powers to investigate Trump MORE's special counsel investigation of the president's campaign and Russia's election interference would be.

"How Congress chooses to address those set of facts and the findings which I believe we are soon to see from the Mueller report is up to them," O'Rourke told CBS.

"I think the American people are going to have a chance to decide this at the ballot box in November 2020, and perhaps that's the best way for us to resolve these outstanding questions," he added.

The comments appeared to be a moderation of his stance enunciated last year during a CNN town hall, when O'Rourke called Trump's defense of Russian President Vladimir Putin over election meddling during a joint press conference "collusion in action."

"[And when in] broad daylight, on Twitter, he asked his attorney general, Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTrump's no racist; he's an equal opportunity offender Press: Acosta, latest to walk the plank The Hill's Morning Report — Trump retreats on census citizenship question MORE, to end the Russia investigation, I would say that's obstruction in action," O'Rourke added last October.

The El Paso native was questioned by King over whether he still believes Trump colluded with Russia during the 2016 election, which the president has frequently denied.

"It's beyond a shadow of a doubt to me that, if there was not collusion, there was at least the effort to collude with a foreign power, beyond the shadow of a doubt that if there was not obstruction of justice, there certainly was the effort to obstruct justice," O'Rourke responded.

Announcing his campaign in a video message Thursday, O'Rourke joined a crowded Democratic field that also includes the likes of Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSanders to call on 2020 Democrats to reject money from drug, health insurance industries The hidden connection between immigration and health care: Our long-term care crisis Harris tops Biden in California 2020 poll MORE (I-Vt.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenHarris tops Biden in California 2020 poll The Hill's Morning Report - A raucous debate on race ends with Trump admonishment Democrats fret over Trump cash machine MORE (D-Mass.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisHarris tops Biden in California 2020 poll The Hill's Morning Report - A raucous debate on race ends with Trump admonishment Democrats fret over Trump cash machine MORE (D-Calif.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump digs in ahead of House vote to condemn tweet 'Game of Thrones' scores record-breaking 32 Emmy nominations The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by JUUL Labs - House to vote to condemn Trump tweet MORE (D-N.Y.).

O'Rourke challenged Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzGoogle official denies allegations of ties to China The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by JUUL Labs - House to vote to condemn Trump tweet Cruz in 2016 said 'something fundamentally wrong' with Christians who back Trump: book MORE (R-Texas) in last year's midterms. Though he lost the election, the close race and his impressive fundraising gained him national attention.