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O'Rourke on impeachment: 2020 vote may be best way to 'resolve' Trump

O'Rourke on impeachment: 2020 vote may be best way to 'resolve' Trump
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Former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeCalls grow for Democrats to ramp up spending in Texas Texas Dems highlight health care in fight to flip state House Union leader vows 'infrequent' minority voters will help deliver Biden victory MORE (D-Texas) on Thursday appeared to back away from his calls to impeach President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden holds massive cash advantage over Trump ahead of Election Day Tax records show Trump maintains a Chinese bank account: NYT Trump plays video of Biden, Harris talking about fracking at Pennsylvania rally MORE, pointing to the 2020 election as the best way to remove him from office.

In an interview with "CBS This Morning," the former Texas congressman, who announced his 2020 candidacy on Thursday, told Gayle King that the ballot box was "perhaps" the best place to take action against the president.

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It would be up to Congress, he added, to determine what the response to Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE's special counsel investigation of the president's campaign and Russia's election interference would be.

"How Congress chooses to address those set of facts and the findings which I believe we are soon to see from the Mueller report is up to them," O'Rourke told CBS.

"I think the American people are going to have a chance to decide this at the ballot box in November 2020, and perhaps that's the best way for us to resolve these outstanding questions," he added.

The comments appeared to be a moderation of his stance enunciated last year during a CNN town hall, when O'Rourke called Trump's defense of Russian President Vladimir Putin over election meddling during a joint press conference "collusion in action."

"[And when in] broad daylight, on Twitter, he asked his attorney general, Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsHarris walks fine line on Barrett as election nears The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Trump's erratic tweets upend stimulus talks; COVID-19 spreads in White House The Memo: Team Trump looks to Pence to steady ship in VP debate MORE, to end the Russia investigation, I would say that's obstruction in action," O'Rourke added last October.

The El Paso native was questioned by King over whether he still believes Trump colluded with Russia during the 2016 election, which the president has frequently denied.

"It's beyond a shadow of a doubt to me that, if there was not collusion, there was at least the effort to collude with a foreign power, beyond the shadow of a doubt that if there was not obstruction of justice, there certainly was the effort to obstruct justice," O'Rourke responded.

Announcing his campaign in a video message Thursday, O'Rourke joined a crowded Democratic field that also includes the likes of Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersOcasio-Cortez rolls out Twitch channel to urge voting Calls grow for Democrats to ramp up spending in Texas The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Goldman Sachs - Tipping point week for Trump, Biden, Congress, voters MORE (I-Vt.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenJustice Department charges Google with illegally maintaining search monopoly Overnight Health Care: Trump takes criticism of Fauci to a new level | GOP Health Committee chairman defends Fauci | Birx confronted Pence about Atlas Senate Democrats call for ramped up Capitol coronavirus testing MORE (D-Mass.), Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisTrump plays video of Biden, Harris talking about fracking at Pennsylvania rally Overnight Defense: US, Russia closer on nuclear treaty extension after Moscow accepts warhead freeze | Khashoggi's fiancee sues Saudi crown prince | Biden nets hundreds more national security endorsements Democrats make gains in Georgia Senate races: poll MORE (D-Calif.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandInternal Democratic poll: Desiree Tims gains on Mike Turner in Ohio House race Hillicon Valley: Facebook, Twitter's handling of New York Post article raises election night concerns | FCC to move forward with considering order targeting tech's liability shield | YouTube expands polices to tackle QAnon Democrats question Amazon over reported interference of workers' rights to organize MORE (D-N.Y.).

O'Rourke challenged Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Goldman Sachs - Two weeks out, Trump attempts to rally the base Senate Republicans offer constitutional amendment to block Supreme Court packing 10 bellwether counties that could signal where the election is headed MORE (R-Texas) in last year's midterms. Though he lost the election, the close race and his impressive fundraising gained him national attention.