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Kirsten Gillibrand officially announces White House run

Kirsten Gillibrand officially announces White House run
© Stefani Reynolds

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandDemocratic senators urge Facebook to take action on anti-Muslim bigotry Social media responds to Harris making history: 'I feel like our ancestors are rejoicing' Ocasio-Cortez says she doesn't plan on 'staying in the House forever' MORE (D-N.Y.) on Sunday officially announced she is running for president in 2020. 

The Democratic senator, who announced an exploratory committee for a potential run in January, takes aim at President TrumpDonald John TrumpMinnesota certifies Biden victory Trump tells allies he plans to pardon Michael Flynn: report Republican John James concedes in Michigan Senate race MORE and highlights a number of progressive causes in a launch video that asks "Will brave win?"

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"Brave doesn’t spread hate, cloud truth, build a wall," Gillibrand says in the video. "That’s what fear does."

Gillibrand also calls for universal health care, paid family leave, ending gun violence, a Green New Deal and getting money out of politics and points to activists such as striking public school teachers and Women's March participants.

Gillibrand, 52, joins a crowded and historically diverse pool of Democratic candidates vying to take on Trump in 2020. She is one of six women who have announced runs so far.

The senator also announced a campaign kickoff rally in front of Trump International Hotel and Tower in New York next week.

"We’re bringing the fight to Trump’s doorstep," the event's page reads. 

Gillibrand, who was first appointed to replace Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonIntercept DC bureau chief says Biden picks are 'same people' from Obama years The Hill's 12:30 Report - Third vaccine candidate with 90% efficacy Biden won — so why did Trump's popularity hit its highest point ever? MORE in the Senate in 2009, has enjoyed national attention in recent years, largely because of her activism in the #MeToo movement. She has long been an advocate for victims of sexual assault and harassment in the military, in the workplace and on Capitol Hill. 

Gillibrand faced some criticism from other Democrats when she became the first Democratic senator to call for the resignation of then-Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Trump, Biden clash over transition holdup, pandemic plans The Hill's Morning Report - Fearing defeat, Trump claims 'illegal' ballots The Hill's Morning Report - Biden inches closer to victory MORE (D-Minn.) over allegations of sexual misconduct. Her office also came under scrutiny this month because of a report that a former female staffer resigned over the alleged mishandling of her sexual harassment complaint. 

This report was updated at 7:42 a.m.