Kirsten Gillibrand officially announces White House run

Kirsten Gillibrand officially announces White House run
© Stefani Reynolds

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandOvernight Defense: Guardsman to testify Lafayette Square clearing was 'unprovoked escalation' | Dems push for controversial Pentagon nominee to withdraw | Watchdog says Pentagon not considering climate change risks to contractors Democrats urge controversial Pentagon policy nominee to withdraw Desiree Tims outraises longtime GOP Rep. Michael Turner by more than 0K in second quarter MORE (D-N.Y.) on Sunday officially announced she is running for president in 2020. 

The Democratic senator, who announced an exploratory committee for a potential run in January, takes aim at President TrumpDonald John TrumpOklahoma City Thunder players kneel during anthem despite threat from GOP state lawmaker Microsoft moving forward with talks to buy TikTok after conversation with Trump Controversial Trump nominee placed in senior role after nomination hearing canceled MORE and highlights a number of progressive causes in a launch video that asks "Will brave win?"

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"Brave doesn’t spread hate, cloud truth, build a wall," Gillibrand says in the video. "That’s what fear does."

Gillibrand also calls for universal health care, paid family leave, ending gun violence, a Green New Deal and getting money out of politics and points to activists such as striking public school teachers and Women's March participants.

Gillibrand, 52, joins a crowded and historically diverse pool of Democratic candidates vying to take on Trump in 2020. She is one of six women who have announced runs so far.

The senator also announced a campaign kickoff rally in front of Trump International Hotel and Tower in New York next week.

"We’re bringing the fight to Trump’s doorstep," the event's page reads. 

Gillibrand, who was first appointed to replace Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonState polling problematic — again 4 reasons why Trump can't be written off — yet 'Unmasking' Steele dossier source: Was confidentiality ever part of the deal? MORE in the Senate in 2009, has enjoyed national attention in recent years, largely because of her activism in the #MeToo movement. She has long been an advocate for victims of sexual assault and harassment in the military, in the workplace and on Capitol Hill. 

Gillibrand faced some criticism from other Democrats when she became the first Democratic senator to call for the resignation of then-Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenCNN publishes first Al Franken op-ed since resignation Political world mourns loss of comedian Jerry Stiller Maher to Tara Reade on timing of sexual assault allegation: 'Why wait until Biden is our only hope?' MORE (D-Minn.) over allegations of sexual misconduct. Her office also came under scrutiny this month because of a report that a former female staffer resigned over the alleged mishandling of her sexual harassment complaint. 

This report was updated at 7:42 a.m.