O'Rourke not planning, but not ruling out big fundraisers

O'Rourke not planning, but not ruling out big fundraisers
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Beto O'RourkeRobert (Beto) Francis O'RourkeBannon says an O'Rourke-Harris ticket poses the greatest threat to Trump in 2020 Biden-Abrams ticket would be a genius media move The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump attacks on McCain rattle GOP senators MORE said Saturday he does not have any plans to hold large-dollar fundraisers for his presidential campaign, but declined to rule out the possibility of such events in the future.

"I’m not planning to do large-dollar fundraisers," O'Rourke told reporters in Iowa.

"Right now, we’re ruling out taking any PAC money, any lobbyist money, ever,"  the El Paso Democrat added. "I have no large-dollar fundraisers planned and I don’t plan to do them."

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O'Rourke entered the field of 2020 Democratic presidential candidates last week, joining Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenBannon says an O'Rourke-Harris ticket poses the greatest threat to Trump in 2020 Trump has lost support from male voters since shutdown, analysis shows Rock the Vote President calls for dismantling of electoral college MORE (D-Mass.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisStrategist says Trump is 'retreating' from talking about foreign policy Bannon says an O'Rourke-Harris ticket poses the greatest threat to Trump in 2020 Trump has lost support from male voters since shutdown, analysis shows MORE (D-Calif.), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharHarris's stepkids call her 'Momala' Sanders joins striking workers at UCLA in first 2020 California visit Lawmakers urge tech to root out extremism after New Zealand MORE (D-Minn.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerBannon says an O'Rourke-Harris ticket poses the greatest threat to Trump in 2020 Jared Kushner's brother made last-minute donation to Beto O'Rourke Senate campaign Biden advisers mull launch naming Abrams as running mate: report MORE (D-N.J.) and Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersBannon says an O'Rourke-Harris ticket poses the greatest threat to Trump in 2020 Trump has lost support from male voters since shutdown, analysis shows Watchdog group calls on 2020 candidates to release 10 years of tax returns MORE (I-Vt.), among others, in seeking the nomination.

 

The former three-term congressman proved to be a fundraising juggernaut in his unsuccessful bid to unseat Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzBiden-Abrams ticket would be a genius media move Families of Kenyan victims seek compensation for Ethiopian Airlines crash 737 crisis tests Boeing's clout in Washington MORE (R-Texas) last year, raising millions of dollars. He has not yet disclosed his fundraising totals in the days since he announced his presidential candidacy.

While many candidates have pledged to not accept money from corporations and have ruled out forming super PACs, Warren has taken it a step further.

She pledged late last month that her campaign would forgo "fancy receptions or big money fundraisers."