Warren calls for abolishing Electoral College

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOvernight Energy: Major oil companies oppose Trump admin's methane rollback | Union files unfair labor practice charge against EPA USPS inspector general reviewing DeJoy's policy changes Former Obama speechwriter Favreau: 'Hilarious' some media outlets calling Harris a moderate MORE (D-Mass.) on Monday called for abolishing the Electoral College and moving to a national popular vote for presidential elections.

Warren, who is seeking the Democratic nomination for president, said during a CNN town hall in Mississippi that her view "is that every vote matters."

"And the way we can make that happen is that we can have national voting and that means get rid of the Electoral College," she added.

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Warren added that she wanted to push the message in Mississippi because, during a general election, "candidates don't come to places like Mississippi" or other non-swing states.

“They also don’t come to places like California and Massachusetts because we’re not the battleground states," she noted. "We need to make sure that every vote counts." 

South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg, a fellow Democratic presidential candidate, has also called for getting rid of the Electoral College, saying earlier this year that it has made the U.S. "less and less democratic."

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersFormer Obama speechwriter Favreau: 'Hilarious' some media outlets calling Harris a moderate Trump to counter DNC with travel to swing states Progressives look to flex their muscle in next Congress after primary wins MORE (I-Vt.), who is also seeking the nomination after an unsuccessful campaign in the previous election, in 2016 called for a "reassessment" of the Electoral College.

The push to consider moving to a national popular vote comes as several Democratic states in recent years have entered into the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact, an agreement that would essentially bypass the Electoral College if enough states join.

The Electoral College has faced renewed scrutiny from the left after 2016 Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonMcGrath reshuffles campaign in home stretch to Senate election Appeals court blocks Hillary Clinton deposition on private email server What Biden must do to keep his lead and win MORE lost the presidential election despite winning the national popular vote by just under 3 million votes. President TrumpDonald John TrumpUPS, FedEx shut down calls to handle mail-in ballots, warn of 'significant' problems: report Controversial GOP Georgia candidate attempts to distance from QAnon Trump orders TikTok parent company to sell US assets within 90 days MORE won the Electoral College, though, by a margin of 304 to 227.

And in 2000, Republican nominee George W. Bush won the Electoral College vote over then-Vice President Al GoreAlbert (Al) Arnold GoreUSPS warns Pennsylvania mail-in ballots may not be delivered in time to be counted Willie Brown now pleased Harris accepted Biden offer after advising against it Trump grabs 'third rail' of politics with payroll tax pause MORE while losing the national popular vote by little more than 540,000 votes.

Updated at 10:28 p.m.