Warren calls for abolishing Electoral College

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenGabbard hits DNC over poll criteria for debates The Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch Keystone XL Pipeline gets nod from Nebraska Supreme Court MORE (D-Mass.) on Monday called for abolishing the Electoral College and moving to a national popular vote for presidential elections.

Warren, who is seeking the Democratic nomination for president, said during a CNN town hall in Mississippi that her view "is that every vote matters."

"And the way we can make that happen is that we can have national voting and that means get rid of the Electoral College," she added.

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Warren added that she wanted to push the message in Mississippi because, during a general election, "candidates don't come to places like Mississippi" or other non-swing states.

“They also don’t come to places like California and Massachusetts because we’re not the battleground states," she noted. "We need to make sure that every vote counts." 

South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg, a fellow Democratic presidential candidate, has also called for getting rid of the Electoral College, saying earlier this year that it has made the U.S. "less and less democratic."

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersGabbard hits DNC over poll criteria for debates The Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch Keystone XL Pipeline gets nod from Nebraska Supreme Court MORE (I-Vt.), who is also seeking the nomination after an unsuccessful campaign in the previous election, in 2016 called for a "reassessment" of the Electoral College.

The push to consider moving to a national popular vote comes as several Democratic states in recent years have entered into the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact, an agreement that would essentially bypass the Electoral College if enough states join.

The Electoral College has faced renewed scrutiny from the left after 2016 Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThe road not taken: Another FBI failure involving the Clintons surfaces DHS cyber agency to prioritize election security, Chinese threats ABC chose a debate moderator who hates Trump MORE lost the presidential election despite winning the national popular vote by just under 3 million votes. President TrumpDonald John TrumpThe Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch To ward off recession, Trump should keep his mouth and smartphone shut Trump: 'Who is our bigger enemy,' Fed chief or Chinese leader? MORE won the Electoral College, though, by a margin of 304 to 227.

And in 2000, Republican nominee George W. Bush won the Electoral College vote over then-Vice President Al GoreAlbert (Al) Arnold GoreOcasio-Cortez blasts Electoral College as a 'scam' 2020 Democrats release joint statement ahead of Trump's New Hampshire rally Deregulated energy markets made Texas a clean energy giant MORE while losing the national popular vote by little more than 540,000 votes.

Updated at 10:28 p.m.