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Graham: Dems want to abolish Electoral College because they 'want rural America to go away'

Graham: Dems want to abolish Electoral College because they 'want rural America to go away'
© Greg Nash

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamLindsey Graham: GOP can't 'move forward without President Trump' House to advance appropriations bills in June, July The unflappable Liz Cheney: Why Trump Republicans have struggled to crush her  MORE (R-S.C.) on Tuesday said calls by Democrats to abolish the Electoral College are being driven by a desire to minimize rural America's influence on politics.

"The desire to abolish the Electoral College is driven by the idea Democrats want rural America to go away politically," Graham said on Twitter, linking to a Fox News report on Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenDebate over ICBMs: Will 'defund our defenses' be next? Manchin on collision course with Warren, Sanders Hillicon Valley: Broadband companies funded fake net neutrality comments, investigation finds | Twitter rolls out tip feature | Google to adopt 'hybrid work week' MORE's (D-Mass.) call to move to a national popular vote for presidential elections. 

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Warren, who is running for president, came out in support of eliminating the Electoral College on Monday night during a CNN town hall in Mississippi.

"Every vote matters," Warren said. "And the way we can make that happen is that we can have national voting and that means get rid of the Electoral College."

Warren justified her stance by noting that the presidential candidates don't spend much time in nonswing states such as Mississippi, Massachusetts and California. 

President TrumpDonald TrumpDemocrats, activists blast reported Trump DOJ effort to get journalists' phone records Arizona secretary of state gets security detail over death threats surrounding election audit Trump admin got phone records of WaPo reporters covering Russia probe: report MORE lost the popular vote to Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonMcConnell: Taliban could take over Afghanistan by 'the end of the year' Hillary Clinton: There must be a 'global reckoning' with disinformation Pelosi's archbishop calls for Communion to be withheld from public figures supporting abortion rights MORE in 2016, even though he defeated her in the Electoral College. In 2000, President George W. Bush won the Electoral College after the disputed contest in Florida, even as he lost the popular vote to Democrat Al GoreAlbert (Al) Arnold GoreHawaii legislature passes bill to implement automatic voter registration Libertarians elected Biden Gore believes China will 'overachieve' on emissions goal MORE.

The push to move away from the Electoral College has gained increased traction since Trump's election, with several Democratic-leaning states entering a National Popular Vote Interstate Compact that calls for bypassing the Electoral College in favor of the national popular vote.  

The compact cannot go into effect until the coalition includes states that accumulate at least 270 electoral votes.

South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg is another potential Democratic presidential candidate who has called for eliminating the Electoral College. Buttigieg, who launched a 2020 exploratory committee earlier this year, has said that the system is becoming "less and less democratic."