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O'Rourke sees 'a lot of wisdom' in abolishing Electoral College

O'Rourke sees 'a lot of wisdom' in abolishing Electoral College
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Presidential candidate and former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeO'Rourke clarifies remarks, leaves door open to gubernatorial bid O'Rourke says he's not planning on run for Texas governor O'Rourke slams Cruz for video of border visit MORE (D-Texas) said Tuesday that he sees "a lot of wisdom" in abolishing the Electoral College.

“I think there’s a lot of wisdom in that," he said in a video posted to Twitter. 

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“You had an election in 2016 where the loser got 3 million more votes than the victor," he also said. "It puts some states out of play all together.”  

 

 

The Electoral College is coming under increasing criticism, particularly from Democrats, after President TrumpDonald TrumpSunday shows preview: House GOP removes Cheney from leadership position; CDC issues new guidance for fully vaccinated Americans Navajo Nation president on Arizona's new voting restrictions: An 'assault' on our rights The Memo: Lawmakers on edge after Greene's spat with Ocasio-Cortez MORE won the 2016 election despite losing the popular vote. Former President George W. Bush also won the presidency in 2000 after losing the popular vote to Democratic nominee Al GoreAlbert (Al) Arnold GoreHawaii legislature passes bill to implement automatic voter registration Libertarians elected Biden Gore believes China will 'overachieve' on emissions goal MORE

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren calls for US to support ceasefire between Israel and Hamas Sanders: Netanyahu has cultivated 'racist nationalism' Tensions mount among Democrats over US-Israel policy MORE (D-Mass.), another 2020 presidential contender, said in a CNN town hall on Monday that she wants to abolish the Electoral College, adding that "every vote matters."

Meanwhile, Delaware and Colorado have taken steps to become the latest states to sign on to a plan that would effectively circumvent the Electoral College. 

That plan, called the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact, is an alliance of states that would commit to awarding their electoral votes to whoever wins the national popular vote. 

However, so far, the states agreeing to the plan are well short of the 270 electoral votes needed to win the White House — and activate the compact's promise. 

O'Rourke, who came close to defeating Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzFormer OMB pick Neera Tanden to serve as senior adviser to Biden Seth Rogen says he's not in a feud with 'fascist' Ted Cruz, whose 'words caused people to die' GOP votes to replace Cheney with Stefanik after backing from Trump MORE (R) in Texas last year, launched his presidential campaign last week.

His campaign announced raising $6.1 million in his first day, more than any other candidate.

O'Rourke joins a crowded field fighting for the Democratic nomination, including Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersWarren calls for US to support ceasefire between Israel and Hamas Prominent Muslim group to boycott White House Eid celebration over stance on Israel-Gaza violence Biden speaks with Israel's Netanyahu again amid ramped-up strikes in Gaza MORE (I-Vt.), Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisHere's why Joe Biden polls well, but Kamala Harris does not Immigration experts say GOP senators questioned DHS secretary with misleading chart Carper urges Biden to nominate ambassadors amid influx at border MORE (D-Calif.) and Cory BookerCory BookerPolice reform talks hit familiar stumbling block Almost 20 advocacy groups team up to pressure Congress to pass health care bill for immigrants Biden adds pressure to congressional talks with self-imposed deadlines MORE (D-N.J.).