O'Rourke sees 'a lot of wisdom' in abolishing Electoral College

O'Rourke sees 'a lot of wisdom' in abolishing Electoral College
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Presidential candidate and former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeTrump mocks Booker over suspended presidential campaign Julián Castro endorses Warren in 2020 race Klobuchar faces make-or-break Iowa sprint after strong debate MORE (D-Texas) said Tuesday that he sees "a lot of wisdom" in abolishing the Electoral College.

“I think there’s a lot of wisdom in that," he said in a video posted to Twitter. 

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“You had an election in 2016 where the loser got 3 million more votes than the victor," he also said. "It puts some states out of play all together.”  

 

 

The Electoral College is coming under increasing criticism, particularly from Democrats, after President TrumpDonald John TrumpLev Parnas implicates Rick Perry, says Giuliani had him pressure Ukraine to announce Biden probe Saudi Arabia paid 0 million for cost of US troops in area Parnas claims ex-Trump attorney visited him in jail, asked him to sacrifice himself for president MORE won the 2016 election despite losing the popular vote. Former President George W. Bush also won the presidency in 2000 after losing the popular vote to Democratic nominee Al GoreAlbert (Al) Arnold GoreNH Democratic Party chairman rips Bloomberg op-ed as 'desperate for some press attention' It's time to provide needed reform to the organ donation system On The Trail: History is not on Biden's side MORE

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenEx-Obama official on Sanders-Warren feud: 'I don't think it played out well for either of them' Former Vermont Governor: Sanders 'will play dirty' Hill.TV's Krystal Ball rips Warren over feud with Sanders MORE (D-Mass.), another 2020 presidential contender, said in a CNN town hall on Monday that she wants to abolish the Electoral College, adding that "every vote matters."

Meanwhile, Delaware and Colorado have taken steps to become the latest states to sign on to a plan that would effectively circumvent the Electoral College. 

That plan, called the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact, is an alliance of states that would commit to awarding their electoral votes to whoever wins the national popular vote. 

However, so far, the states agreeing to the plan are well short of the 270 electoral votes needed to win the White House — and activate the compact's promise. 

O'Rourke, who came close to defeating Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSeven things to know about the Trump trial All the frontrunners could survive initial Iowa test Republicans face internal brawl over impeachment witnesses MORE (R) in Texas last year, launched his presidential campaign last week.

His campaign announced raising $6.1 million in his first day, more than any other candidate.

O'Rourke joins a crowded field fighting for the Democratic nomination, including Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersEx-Obama official on Sanders-Warren feud: 'I don't think it played out well for either of them' Former Vermont Governor: Sanders 'will play dirty' Hill.TV's Krystal Ball rips Warren over feud with Sanders MORE (I-Vt.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisOvernight Energy: Schumer votes against USMCA, citing climate impact | Republicans offer details on their environmental proposals | Microsoft aims to be carbon negative by 2030 Here are the 10 senators who voted against Trump's North American trade deal Team Trump criticizes Sanders for vote against USMCA MORE (D-Calif.) and Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerNew Hampshire state lawmaker switches support from Warren to Klobuchar Here are the 10 senators who voted against Trump's North American trade deal Team Trump criticizes Sanders for vote against USMCA MORE (D-N.J.).