O'Rourke sees 'a lot of wisdom' in abolishing Electoral College

O'Rourke sees 'a lot of wisdom' in abolishing Electoral College
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Presidential candidate and former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeBiden will help close out Texas Democrats' virtual convention: report O'Rourke on Texas reopening: 'Dangerous, dumb and weak' Parties gear up for battle over Texas state House MORE (D-Texas) said Tuesday that he sees "a lot of wisdom" in abolishing the Electoral College.

“I think there’s a lot of wisdom in that," he said in a video posted to Twitter. 

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“You had an election in 2016 where the loser got 3 million more votes than the victor," he also said. "It puts some states out of play all together.”  

 

 

The Electoral College is coming under increasing criticism, particularly from Democrats, after President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump says inviting Russia to G7 'a question of common sense' Pentagon chief does not support invoking Insurrection Act Dershowitz: Does President Trump have power to declare martial law? MORE won the 2016 election despite losing the popular vote. Former President George W. Bush also won the presidency in 2000 after losing the popular vote to Democratic nominee Al GoreAlbert (Al) Arnold GoreCNN coronavirus town hall to feature science author David Quammen, 'Empire' actress Taraji Henson Top Democratic pollster advised Biden campaign to pick Warren as VP Melania Trump to appear on CNN coronavirus town hall Thursday night MORE

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenThe Hill's Morning Report - Protesters' defiance met with calls to listen Biden wins DC primary Warren asks Pentagon IG to probe military role in Trump's protest response MORE (D-Mass.), another 2020 presidential contender, said in a CNN town hall on Monday that she wants to abolish the Electoral College, adding that "every vote matters."

Meanwhile, Delaware and Colorado have taken steps to become the latest states to sign on to a plan that would effectively circumvent the Electoral College. 

That plan, called the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact, is an alliance of states that would commit to awarding their electoral votes to whoever wins the national popular vote. 

However, so far, the states agreeing to the plan are well short of the 270 electoral votes needed to win the White House — and activate the compact's promise. 

O'Rourke, who came close to defeating Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzGOP senators dodge on treatment of White House protesters Houston police chief responds to Trump advice on protests: 'Keep your mouth shut' Trump's vow to deploy military faces GOP pushback MORE (R) in Texas last year, launched his presidential campaign last week.

His campaign announced raising $6.1 million in his first day, more than any other candidate.

O'Rourke joins a crowded field fighting for the Democratic nomination, including Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden wins DC primary Biden wins Montana primary Biden wins New Mexico primary MORE (I-Vt.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisThe Hill's Morning Report - Protesters' defiance met with calls to listen Calls for police reform sparks divisions in Congress Harris: Trump 'just tear-gassed peaceful protesters for a photo op' MORE (D-Calif.) and Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerCalls for police reform sparks divisions in Congress Schumer calls on McConnell to schedule vote on law enforcement reform bill before July 4 This week: Senate reconvenes as protests roil nation amid pandemic MORE (D-N.J.).