Biden leads CNN poll, but Harris, Sanders on the rise

Biden leads CNN poll, but Harris, Sanders on the rise
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Former Vice President Joe BidenJoseph (Joe) Robinette BidenButtigieg says he doubts Sanders can win general election This is the Joe Biden you rarely see Minorities, older adults push Biden to top of 2020 poll MORE is leading a new CNN poll of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents that also shows increasing support for Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisDemocrats' CNN town halls exposed an extreme agenda The Hill's Morning Report - Will Joe Biden's unifying strategy work? K Street support to test Buttigieg MORE (D-Calif.).

Biden, who has yet to enter the Democratic presidential race, is out in front with 28 percent of those polled. In second place is Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersDemocrats' CNN town halls exposed an extreme agenda Buttigieg says he doubts Sanders can win general election Meghan McCain: Bernie Sanders supporting prisoners being able to vote 'bats**t insane' MORE (I-Vt.), who is backed by 20 percent of voters.

But support for Harris in the poll has jumped to 12 percent, an 8-point increase since the most recent edition of the poll was released in December.

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Following Harris is former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-Texas) at 11 percent. O’Rourke launched his presidential campaign last week.

No other candidate received double-digit support in the poll. Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenDemocrats' CNN town halls exposed an extreme agenda Minorities, older adults push Biden to top of 2020 poll The difference between good and bad tax reform MORE (D-Mass.) is in fifth with 6 percent of support, according to the poll.

Biden's support dropped from 30 percent to 28 percent, while Sanders's support rose from 14 percent to 20 percent. 

O'Rourke also saw a two-point climb from the last poll, while Warren went up from 3 percent to 6 percent.

Former Secretary of State John KerryJohn Forbes KerryChina, Russia, Iran rise in Latin America as US retreats The Memo: Harris move shows shift in politics of gun control Overnight Defense: Trump ends sanctions waivers for buying Iranian oil | At least four Americans killed in Sri Lanka attacks | Sanders pushes for Yemen veto override vote MORE (D), who has yet to enter the race, gets 4 percent, while Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerK Street support to test Buttigieg We should welcome workers' 'powerful victory' in the Stop & Shop strike Harris adds another to her list of endorsements in South Carolina MORE (D-N.J.), who is in the race, has 3 percent.

A more centrist candidate, Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharDemocrats' CNN town halls exposed an extreme agenda Spicer: 'Near impossible' for 2020 Democrats to refuse Fox News debate James Comey, wife donated ,400 to Klobuchar's presidential campaign MORE of Minnesota (D), also gets 3 percent.

No other candidate in the race has more than 1 percent. That group includes Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandThe Hill's Morning Report - Will Joe Biden's unifying strategy work? K Street support to test Buttigieg Kamala Harris backs putting third gender option on federal ID MORE (D-N.Y.), Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardGabbard: Trump, Pence 'try to hide the truth' of Saudi-inspired terrorist attacks from Christian supporters 2020 Dems rebuke Trump on Iran, say they'd put US back in nuclear deal New 2020 candidate Moulton on hypothetical Mars invasion: 'I would not build a wall' MORE (D-Hawaii) and former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper (D).

Those results are based based on interviews with 456 Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents between March 14 and March 17. The margin of error is 5.7 percentage points.

The CNN poll also found that 40 percent of respondents are "extremely enthusiastic" about voting for president in 2020. The enthusiasm is higher among Republicans, with 57 percent of self-identified Republicans responding that they are "extremely enthusiastic," compared to 46 percent of Democrats and 26 percent of independents.

The full CNN poll was based on interviews with 1,003 adults between March 14 and March 17. The full sample has a margin of error of 3.8 percentage points. 

The majority of Republicans also said they think the GOP should nominate President TrumpDonald John TrumpDemocrats' CNN town halls exposed an extreme agenda Buttigieg says he doubts Sanders can win general election Post-Mueller, Trump has a good story to tell for 2020 MORE in 2020, with 76 percent saying Trump should be the nominee and 19 percent saying a different candidate should be nominated.