Biden leads CNN poll, but Harris, Sanders on the rise

Biden leads CNN poll, but Harris, Sanders on the rise
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Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenPossible GOP challenger says Trump doesn't doesn't deserve reelection, but would vote for him over Democrat Joe Biden faces an uncertain path The Memo: Trump pushes back amid signs of economic slowdown MORE is leading a new CNN poll of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents that also shows increasing support for Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisJoe Biden faces an uncertain path Biden: 'There's an awful lot of really good Republicans out there' Fighter pilot vs. astronaut match-up in Arizona could determine control of Senate MORE (D-Calif.).

Biden, who has yet to enter the Democratic presidential race, is out in front with 28 percent of those polled. In second place is Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersJoe Biden faces an uncertain path Bernie Sanders vows to go to 'war with white nationalism and racism' as president Biden: 'There's an awful lot of really good Republicans out there' MORE (I-Vt.), who is backed by 20 percent of voters.

But support for Harris in the poll has jumped to 12 percent, an 8-point increase since the most recent edition of the poll was released in December.

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Following Harris is former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-Texas) at 11 percent. O’Rourke launched his presidential campaign last week.

No other candidate received double-digit support in the poll. Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenPossible GOP challenger says Trump doesn't doesn't deserve reelection, but would vote for him over Democrat Joe Biden faces an uncertain path The Memo: Trump pushes back amid signs of economic slowdown MORE (D-Mass.) is in fifth with 6 percent of support, according to the poll.

Biden's support dropped from 30 percent to 28 percent, while Sanders's support rose from 14 percent to 20 percent. 

O'Rourke also saw a two-point climb from the last poll, while Warren went up from 3 percent to 6 percent.

Former Secretary of State John KerryJohn Forbes KerryTrump's winning weapon: Time The Memo: O'Rourke looks to hit reset button #FreeAustinTice trending on anniversary of kidnapping in Syria MORE (D), who has yet to enter the race, gets 4 percent, while Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerThe Hill's Campaign Report: Battle for Senate begins to take shape Steve King to Gillibrand: Odds of me resigning same as yours of winning presidential nomination We need a climate plan for agriculture MORE (D-N.J.), who is in the race, has 3 percent.

A more centrist candidate, Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharPoll: Nearly 4 in 5 say they will consider candidates' stances on cybersecurity The Hill's Campaign Report: Battle for Senate begins to take shape Native American advocates question 2020 Democrats' commitment MORE of Minnesota (D), also gets 3 percent.

No other candidate in the race has more than 1 percent. That group includes Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandGillibrand: Rosy economic outlook not 'reflected in everyday, kitchen-table issues families are facing' Chris Wallace becomes Trump era's 'equal opportunity inquisitor' Steve King to Gillibrand: Odds of me resigning same as yours of winning presidential nomination MORE (D-N.Y.), Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardNative American advocates question 2020 Democrats' commitment The US can't seem to live without Afghanistan 2020 Democrats release joint statement ahead of Trump's New Hampshire rally MORE (D-Hawaii) and former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper (D).

Those results are based based on interviews with 456 Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents between March 14 and March 17. The margin of error is 5.7 percentage points.

The CNN poll also found that 40 percent of respondents are "extremely enthusiastic" about voting for president in 2020. The enthusiasm is higher among Republicans, with 57 percent of self-identified Republicans responding that they are "extremely enthusiastic," compared to 46 percent of Democrats and 26 percent of independents.

The full CNN poll was based on interviews with 1,003 adults between March 14 and March 17. The full sample has a margin of error of 3.8 percentage points. 

The majority of Republicans also said they think the GOP should nominate President TrumpDonald John TrumpO'Rourke: Trump driving global, U.S. economy into recession Manchin: Trump has 'golden opportunity' on gun reforms Objections to Trump's new immigration rule wildly exaggerated MORE in 2020, with 76 percent saying Trump should be the nominee and 19 percent saying a different candidate should be nominated.