Trump: Campaigning for popular vote 'much easier' than for electoral votes

Trump: Campaigning for popular vote 'much easier' than for electoral votes
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President TrumpDonald John TrumpLawmakers release defense bill with parental leave-for-Space-Force deal House Democrats expected to unveil articles of impeachment Tuesday Houston police chief excoriates McConnell, Cornyn and Cruz on gun violence MORE on Tuesday night argued that campaigning for the popular vote in U.S. elections is "much easier" than campaigning for electoral votes, as Democrats renew their push to circumvent the Electoral College. 

"Campaigning for the Popular Vote is much easier & different than campaigning for the Electoral College," Trump tweeted in part. "It’s like training for the 100 yard dash vs. a marathon."

He added that "Cities would end up running the Country" without the Electoral College and that the current system "is far better for the U.S.A."

Trump won the 2016 presidential election over his Democratic rival Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonFBI head rejects claims of Ukrainian 2016 interference Comey in op-ed after IG report: 'Barr needs to stop acting like a Trump spokesperson' Trump tops list of most tweeted about politicians in 2019 MORE despite the fact that Clinton won the popular vote. That was because he won 304 electoral votes to Clinton's 227. It was only the fifth time in U.S. history that a presidential candidate won the White House but lost the popular vote. 

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The defeat spurred Democrats — who were still fuming from a similar loss in the 2000 election to former President George W. Bush — to renew their effort to bypass the Electoral College. 

Democratic-leaning states across the country, including New York, Illinois and most of the New England states, have begun signing on to a pact that would see them awarding their electoral votes to whomever wins the popular vote.

Colorado Gov. Jared PolisJared Schutz PolisDrudge faces conservative pushback after mocking Trump's Colorado wall comment Trump says remark about Colorado border wall was made 'kiddingly' Colorado governor mocks Trump for saying he's building wall there MORE (D) announced earlier this month that his state also would join the pact. Legislators in 16 other states have introduced similar bills this session, according to National Popular Vote.

But the coalition of blue states is still well short of the 270 electoral votes needed to win the White House.

Critics of the Electoral College say the system incentivizes candidates to focus on only a handful of critical swing states in order to win the necessary electoral votes. And they say it discourages voters in reliably red or blue states from heading to the polls.

Nonetheless, Clinton was heavily criticized for failing to campaign in states such as Wisconsin and Michigan during the 2016 election, leading to a renewed focus on the Midwest as key to the Democrats' effort to take back the White House. 

The Democratic National Committee announced last week that it would be holding its 2020 convention in Milwaukee, underscoring the party's urgency to rectify perceived mistakes from the previous presidential election.