Booker: The person with the most votes should be president

Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony Booker2020 hopeful John Delaney unveils T climate plan Harris readies a Phase 2 as she seeks to rejuvenate campaign T.I., Charlamagne Tha God advocate for opportunity zones on Capitol Hill MORE (D-N.J.) said Wednesday that he believes the person who receives the most votes should win the presidency.

"In a presidential election, the person with the most votes should be the president of the United States," Booker, who is running for president, said in response to a question during a CNN town hall about reforming the Electoral College.

"But … we have to win the next election under the rules that are there now," he added.

Several Democratic 2020 candidates have come out in favor of overhauling or doing away with the Electoral College.

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Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenThe Hill's Morning Report — After contentious week, Trump heads for Japan On The Money: Senate passes disaster aid bill after deal with Trump | Trump to offer B aid package for farmers | House votes to boost retirement savings | Study says new tariffs to double costs for consumers Overnight Energy: Democrats ask if EPA chief misled on vehicle emissions | Dem senators want NBC debate focused on climate change | 2020 hopeful John Delaney unveils T climate plan MORE (D-Mass.) called for abolishing the Electoral College during her own CNN town hall, stating that "every vote matters."

South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegButtiegieg backs NFL players' right to protest during anthem: I 'put my life on the line to defend' that 2020 Democrats join striking McDonald's workers Poll: Nearly half of Clinton's former supporters back Biden MORE, a fellow Democratic presidential candidate, has also called for getting rid of the Electoral College, saying earlier this year that it has made the U.S. "less and less democratic."

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), who is also seeking the Democratic nomination, called for a "reassessment" of the Electoral College in 2016 after then-Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonFrustration boils over with Senate's 'legislative graveyard' Poll: Nearly half of Clinton's former supporters back Biden Harris readies a Phase 2 as she seeks to rejuvenate campaign MORE lost the presidential election despite winning the national popular vote by just under 3 million votes.