Sanders leads poll of young Democrats by double digits

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersTammy Duckworth is the epitome of the American Dream On The Money: Deficit rises to record .7 trillion amid pandemic: CBO | Democrats sidestep budget deal by seeking 0B in emergency spending | House panel advances spending bill with funding boost to IRS Biden-Sanders unity task force calls for Fed, US Postal Service consumer banking MORE (I-Vt.) holds a double-digit lead among young voters in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary, according to a poll released Monday.

Thirty-one percent of likely voters between 18 and 29 years old surveyed by Harvard University's Institute of Politics said they prefer the Vermont lawmaker in a hypothetical primary.

ADVERTISEMENT

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden says he will rejoin WHO on his first day in office Tammy Duckworth is the epitome of the American Dream Mexico's president uses US visit to tout ties with Trump MORE was the first pick of 20 percent of respondents, while former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeBellwether counties show trouble for Trump Colorado GOP Rep. Scott Tipton defeated in primary upset Clinton, Buttigieg among Democrats set to hold virtual events for Biden MORE (D-Texas) received 10 percent of the support. No other candidate received more than 5 percent.

The youth vote has plenty of time to shift though, as 20 percent of the likely voters said they remain undecided.

“Proving that young voters see more than age, it’s notable that the candidates with the most experience in government service are leading a diverse field at this early stage in the process,” John Della Volpe, director of polling for the Institute of Politics, said in a statement.

“Compared to this point in the last presidential cycle, young Democratic voters are more engaged and likely to have an even greater impact in choosing their party’s nominee,” he added.

Sanders's support among young voters has consistently placed him near the top of national and early state vote polls. 

The Institute for Politics surveyed 934 likely voters nationwide from March 8 to 20. The margin of error for the sample is 4.5 percentage points.