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Sanders: Packing Supreme Court not the 'ultimate solution'

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersCentrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting Democrats facing tough reelections back bipartisan infrastructure deal The Hill's Morning Report - ObamaCare here to stay MORE (I-Vt.) reportedly said Monday that adding additional seats to the Supreme Court, often referred to as "packing," is “not the ultimate solution."

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“My worry is that the next time the Republicans are in power they will do the same thing. I think that is not the ultimate solution,” Sanders said at an event in Washington, D.C., according to Reuters.

Sanders floated solutions he said would better address the issue of judicial appointees, including term limits for the justices, who currently serve lifetime terms, or a system under which justices rotated between the high court and appeals courts, the news service noted.

The idea of adding justices to the court has gained steam among some progressive activists as a method of tempering the effects of President TrumpDonald TrumpHead of firms that pushed 'Italygate' theory falsely claimed VA mansion was her home: report Centrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting VA moving to cover gender affirmation surgery through department health care MORE’s two appointees, who have given conservatives on the court a 5-4 majority.

Other Democratic presidential candidates, including South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegHigh-speed rail getting last minute push in Congress Buttigieg: Bipartisan deal on infrastructure 'strongly preferred' OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden ends infrastructure talks with key Republican | Colonial Pipeline CEO grilled over ransomware attack | Texas gov signs bills to improve power grid after winter storm MORE and former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke, have signaled openness to expanding the high court. O’Rourke and Buttigieg have also both talked up a system in which Democrats and Republicans would name five appointees each to the court.

“This central objective [in] that is to prevent the Supreme Court from continuing on this trajectory to become basically ruined by being a nakedly political institution,” Buttigieg said in March.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGOP increasingly balks at calling Jan. 6 an insurrection Black lawmakers warn against complacency after Juneteenth victory Graham quips key to working with Trump: We both 'like him' MORE (R-Ky.), who blocked then-President Obama from appointing Merrick GarlandMerrick GarlandHouse Judiciary asks DOJ to disclose remaining gag orders The Hill's Morning Report - After high-stakes Biden-Putin summit, what now? Biden frustrates death penalty opponents with Supreme Court request MORE to the Supreme Court in 2016, has spoken out against court packing, calling it “a radical proposal that has been dead and buried by bipartisan consensus for almost a century” and accusing Democrats of embracing the idea to avoid the consequences of losing elections.