Sanders: Packing Supreme Court not the 'ultimate solution'

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSupport drops for Medicare for All but increases for public option Hillicon Valley: Warren takes on Facebook over political ads | Zuckerberg defends meetings with conservatives | Civil liberties groups sound alarm over online extremism bill On The Money: Trump touts China trade deal | Wall Street, Washington see signs for caution | Trump threatens sanctions on Turkey | Sanders proposes sharp hike to corporate taxes MORE (I-Vt.) reportedly said Monday that adding additional seats to the Supreme Court, often referred to as "packing," is “not the ultimate solution."

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“My worry is that the next time the Republicans are in power they will do the same thing. I think that is not the ultimate solution,” Sanders said at an event in Washington, D.C., according to Reuters.

Sanders floated solutions he said would better address the issue of judicial appointees, including term limits for the justices, who currently serve lifetime terms, or a system under which justices rotated between the high court and appeals courts, the news service noted.

The idea of adding justices to the court has gained steam among some progressive activists as a method of tempering the effects of President TrumpDonald John TrumpBusiness school deans call for lifting country-specific visa caps Bolton told ex-Trump aide to call White House lawyers about Ukraine pressure campaign: report Federal prosecutors in New York examining Giuliani business dealings with Ukraine: report MORE’s two appointees, who have given conservatives on the court a 5-4 majority.

Other Democratic presidential candidates, including South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegO'Rourke hits back at Buttigieg over criticism of his gun buyback proposal Chasten Buttigieg fundraising for husband Pete overseas Progressives fume at Buttigieg, warn him not to attack Warren at debate MORE and former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke, have signaled openness to expanding the high court. O’Rourke and Buttigieg have also both talked up a system in which Democrats and Republicans would name five appointees each to the court.

“This central objective [in] that is to prevent the Supreme Court from continuing on this trajectory to become basically ruined by being a nakedly political institution,” Buttigieg said in March.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellFury over Trump Syria decision grows Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Trump to slap sanctions on Turkey for Syria offensive | Trump calls on Turkey to broker ceasefire | Pelosi, Graham seek deal on sanctions | Ex-Trump aide testifies in impeachment probe Trump: Let Assad, Russia or China protect the Kurds MORE (R-Ky.), who blocked then-President Obama from appointing Merrick GarlandMerrick Brian GarlandSupreme Court can prove its independence — or its partisan capture The Hill's 12:30 Report: Dems seize on Ukraine transcript in impeachment fight Brett Kavanaugh debate exemplifies culture war between left and right MORE to the Supreme Court in 2016, has spoken out against court packing, calling it “a radical proposal that has been dead and buried by bipartisan consensus for almost a century” and accusing Democrats of embracing the idea to avoid the consequences of losing elections.