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Susan Rice says she won't challenge Susan Collins for Senate seat

Former national security adviser Susan Rice said Thursday that she will not challenge Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Mastercard - Congress inches closer to virus relief deal Lawmakers pressure leaders to reach COVID-19 relief deal Biden says GOP senators have called to congratulate him MORE (R-Maine) for her Senate seat in 2020. 

Rice said that Collins's vote to confirm Supreme Court Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughGOP senators back Christian school's push for COVID-19 carve-out Supreme Court sees new requests for religious COVID-19 carve-outs For Thanksgiving, the Supreme Court upholds religious liberty MORE despite allegations against him of sexual misconduct caused her to consider challenging Collins. 

"I was deeply disappointed when Susan Collins decided to vote for Brett Kavanaugh,” Rice said at the 10th Annual Women in the World Summit in New York. “It felt like a betrayal, frankly, to all women, and it made me think very seriously about whether I ought to run for Senate in 2020.” 

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But Rice said she was not ready to move her family to Maine full time and did not want to put them through the stress of a campaign.

“In the course of weighing it all, I’ve decided with my family that the timing really isn’t right for us,” she said. “I’ve got a daughter going into her junior year in high school in Washington and this is not the time to move ourselves full-time up to Maine and to put my family through the stresses of a campaign.”

Rice added that this does not mean she won't run for office in the future. 

"I don’t rule out running for office in the future,” she said. “In Maine or beyond.”

Rice previously hinted that she would challenge Collins. When former White House communications director Jen Psaki asked on Twitter, "Who wants to run for Senate in Maine?" Rice responded "Me." She later clarified that she was "not making any announcements."

Rice served as an adviser in the Obama administration and also served as ambassador to the United Nations. 

Collins, a moderate, is seen as a potentially vulnerable senator ahead of the 2020 elections, as Maine is a primarily Democratic state. She was one of three Republican senators to vote against repealing the Affordable Care Act, but voted to confirm Kavanaugh. 

Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinSanders says he can't support bipartisan COVID-19 relief proposal in its current form Progressives push for direct payments to be included in COVID-19 relief deal Rubio and Ocasio-Cortez spar on Twitter: 'Work more, tweet less' MORE (W.Va.), the only Democrat who voted to confirm Kavanaugh, said Thursday that he supports Collins's reelection bid and offered to campaign for her.