Julián Castro: Presidential candidates should be required to release tax returns

Former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro, who is running for president, said at a CNN town hall Thursday that he believes presidential candidates should be required to release their tax returns. 

“I support making it a requirement by statute, Congress passing a law that requires people who are running for president to submit 10 years of their tax returns,” he said.

Castro added that he would release 10 years of his own tax returns “during the next few weeks.”

He slammed President TrumpDonald John TrumpImpeachment? Not so fast without missing element of criminal intent Feds say marijuana ties could prevent immigrants from getting US citizenship Trump approval drops to 2019 low after Mueller report's release: poll MORE's refusal to release his returns, saying Trump must have something to hide. 

“It is astonishing that this president still has not released his taxes,” Castro said. “It’s clear that he has something to hide, I don’t.”

But Castro stopped short of saying that it should be a constitutional amendment.

Several other Democrats competing for the party's 2020 presidential nomination, including Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenResurfaced Buttigieg yearbook named him 'most likely to be president' The STATES Act will expose flawed marijuana legacy Impeachment? Not so fast without missing element of criminal intent MORE (D-Mass.), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandResurfaced Buttigieg yearbook named him 'most likely to be president' Court orders EPA to make final decision on banning controversial pesticide Buttigieg says he wouldn't be opposed to having Phish play at his inauguration MORE (D-N.Y.) and Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharSanders announces first endorsements in South Carolina Telehealth is calling — will Congress pick up? 2020 Dems call on Mueller to testify about redacted report MORE (D-Minn.) have already released their returns. President Trump, meanwhile, has repeatedly refused to do so, insisting he is under audit. 

The IRS has said that an audit does not prevent someone from releasing their own tax information.