Julián Castro: Presidential candidates should be required to release tax returns

Former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro, who is running for president, said at a CNN town hall Thursday that he believes presidential candidates should be required to release their tax returns. 

“I support making it a requirement by statute, Congress passing a law that requires people who are running for president to submit 10 years of their tax returns,” he said.

Castro added that he would release 10 years of his own tax returns “during the next few weeks.”

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He slammed President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrumps light 97th annual National Christmas Tree Trump to hold campaign rally in Michigan 'Don't mess with Mama': Pelosi's daughter tweets support following press conference comments MORE's refusal to release his returns, saying Trump must have something to hide. 

“It is astonishing that this president still has not released his taxes,” Castro said. “It’s clear that he has something to hide, I don’t.”

But Castro stopped short of saying that it should be a constitutional amendment.

Several other Democrats competing for the party's 2020 presidential nomination, including Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenTrump to hold campaign rally in Michigan Castro hits fundraising threshold for December debate Buttigieg: Harris 'deserves to be under anybody's consideration' for vice president MORE (D-Mass.), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandHarris posts video asking baby if she'll run for president one day Warren hits Bloomberg, Steyer: They have 'been allowed to buy their way' into 2020 race Supreme Court poised to hear first major gun case in a decade MORE (D-N.Y.) and Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharCastro hits fundraising threshold for December debate Klobuchar lauds power of free press in post about her father The Hill's 12:30 Report: Pelosi says House will move forward with impeachment MORE (D-Minn.) have already released their returns. President Trump, meanwhile, has repeatedly refused to do so, insisting he is under audit. 

The IRS has said that an audit does not prevent someone from releasing their own tax information.