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Abrams: Schumer has been 'relentless but thoughtful' about Senate bid

 
“He has been relentless but thoughtful, and I mean it in this way: He has asked me what I need to see,” Abrams told BuzzFeed in an interview published Friday. “He's answered the questions that I have about the role, about how I would fit into a Senate, whether it’s the majority or the minority.”
 
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Abrams said she believes Democrats will win back the chamber in the 2020 election and that Schumer, who is expected to be majority leader if his party wins control, has been "very creative about ways that I can add to the body politic, should I be in the office. But he also said, you know, ‘The timetable is yours.’ ”
 
The Georgia Democrat narrowly lost her bid to be governor last year, falling to Republican Brian Kemp in a race that sparked lawsuits and accusations of voter suppression against Kemp, who at the time was Georgia's secretary of state.
 
But she would be a top recruit to take on Perdue, who is running for his second term next year, if Democrats can persuade her to run for the Senate instead of launching a national campaign in 2020 amid a crowded presidential primary field.
 
Schumer praised Abrams during a press conference with reporters Thursday in the Capitol, saying that he thinks she would be "a great, great senator." 

"I’ve told her I think she could play a major role in the Senate the minute she got here," he added.
 
  
Abrams told MSNBC's "Morning Joe" earlier this month that she was "truly" thinking about running for president in 2020 but that she needed to first decide if she was going to jump into the Senate race. 
 
"I am thinking about it. I truly am," Abrams said at the time. "I think that the timing for me is first deciding about the Senate because I do think you cannot run for an office unless you know that’s the job you want to do."
 
She added that she wanted to make a decision on whether or not to run for Senate by the end of April. 
 
Democrats hold 47 seats in the Senate heading into the 2020 election, meaning they would need to flip four seats to win back control of the chamber outright. They would also need to hold onto Democratic Sen. Doug Jones's seat in the deeply red state of Alabama or pick up an additional GOP seat. 
 
Jones, who was elected in 2017 during a special election to fill out the remainder of former Sen. Jeff Session's (R-Ala.) term, is viewed as the most vulnerable Democratic senator running next year. 
 
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