Kamala Harris releases 15 years of tax returns, more than any other 2020 candidate

Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisKamala Harris rallies with McDonald's workers striking for higher wages Kamala Harris rallies with McDonald's workers striking for higher wages 22 presidential candidates to attend Clyburn's South Carolina fish fry MORE (D-Calif.) on Sunday released 15 years of her personal tax returns, more than any other 2020 presidential candidate. 

Harris’s campaign released all returns for 2004 through 2018, each year that Harris has held public office.

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A campaign aide said that the decision to release the tax returns makes Harris “the most transparent candidate in the field when it comes to information about personal finances.”

"This is a stark contrast with President TrumpDonald John TrumpDC board rejects Trump Hotel effort to dismiss complaint seeking removal of liquor license on basis of Trump's 'character' DC board rejects Trump Hotel effort to dismiss complaint seeking removal of liquor license on basis of Trump's 'character' Mexico's immigration chief resigns amid US pressure over migrants MORE, who refuses to release his tax returns,” the aide said.

The returns show that Harris and her husband, attorney Douglas Emhoff, reported an adjusted gross income last year of just under $1.9 million. The senator reported making $157,352 from her congressional salary, and a net income of $320,125 from sales of her book.

The couple paid over $2.2 million in federal taxes over the past five years, according to the returns.

Harris and her husband had a higher effective tax rate for 2018 than they did in 2017, though their income was also higher.

It is possible that they are among the roughly 5 percent of households who are expected to receive a tax increase in 2018 from President Trump's tax law. The law, which all Democratic lawmakers voted against, caps the state and local tax deduction at $10,000, and Harris and her husband had about $225,000 in state and local taxes in 2018.

In 2018, Harris and her husband donated $27,259 to charity, including $5,000 to Howard University, where the senator went to college, and $20 to Wikipedia.

A number of other 2020 hopefuls, including Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharHillicon Valley: Hacker group targeted electric grid | House Democrats press CBP over facial recognition program | Senators offer bill to protect health data | Groups file FCC complaint over carriers' use of location data Hillicon Valley: Hacker group targeted electric grid | House Democrats press CBP over facial recognition program | Senators offer bill to protect health data | Groups file FCC complaint over carriers' use of location data It's time to let Medicare to negotiate drug prices MORE (D-Minn.), Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandDemocratic presidential hopefuls react to debate placement Democratic presidential hopefuls react to debate placement The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by MAPRx — Biden, Sanders to share stage at first DNC debate MORE (D-N.Y.) and Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenFive takeaways from first Democratic debate lineup Five takeaways from first Democratic debate lineup Black Economic Alliance official says African-American voters will 'determine who sits in the White House' MORE (D-Mass.), have released their tax returns in recent weeks. Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersKamala Harris rallies with McDonald's workers striking for higher wages Kamala Harris rallies with McDonald's workers striking for higher wages Playing fast and loose with the economic facts MORE (I-Vt.) is expected to release his returns on Monday.

The transparency push comes amid heightened congressional efforts to force the publication of President Trump’s financial information that he has refused to release voluntarily.

Earlier this month, House Democrats requested that the IRS provide six years of Trump’s personal and business tax returns.

Treasury Secretary Steven MnuchinSteven Terner MnuchinOn The Money: DOJ offers legal opinion backing refusal to release Trump tax returns | Centrist Democrats raise concerns over minimum wage | Trump bashes Powell ahead of crucial Fed meeting | Design leaks for Harriet Tubman bill On The Money: DOJ offers legal opinion backing refusal to release Trump tax returns | Centrist Democrats raise concerns over minimum wage | Trump bashes Powell ahead of crucial Fed meeting | Design leaks for Harriet Tubman bill Justice releases legal opinion backing Treasury's refusal to release Trump tax returns MORE said Wednesday that the agency was still reviewing the demand and would not meet the deadline. House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard NealRichard Edmund NealOn The Money: DOJ offers legal opinion backing refusal to release Trump tax returns | Centrist Democrats raise concerns over minimum wage | Trump bashes Powell ahead of crucial Fed meeting | Design leaks for Harriet Tubman bill Justice releases legal opinion backing Treasury's refusal to release Trump tax returns Justice releases legal opinion backing Treasury's refusal to release Trump tax returns MORE (D-Mass.) gave the IRS a new deadline of April 23 to comply with the request.

The Trump administration has accused Democrats of using the requests to the IRS for political gain, claiming the demands do not serve a legislative purpose.

--Naomi Jagoda contributed to this report, which was updated at 10:13 a.m.