Kamala Harris releases 15 years of tax returns, more than any other 2020 candidate

Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisWarren unveils plan to cancel student loan debt, create universal free college Moulton enters 2020 White House race The Hill's Morning Report - Is impeachment back on the table? MORE (D-Calif.) on Sunday released 15 years of her personal tax returns, more than any other 2020 presidential candidate. 

Harris’s campaign released all returns for 2004 through 2018, each year that Harris has held public office.

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A campaign aide said that the decision to release the tax returns makes Harris “the most transparent candidate in the field when it comes to information about personal finances.”

"This is a stark contrast with President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump calls Sri Lankan prime minister following church bombings Ex-Trump lawyer: Mueller knew Trump had to call investigation a 'witch hunt' for 'political reasons' The biggest challenge from the Mueller Report depends on the vigilance of everyone MORE, who refuses to release his tax returns,” the aide said.

The returns show that Harris and her husband, attorney Douglas Emhoff, reported an adjusted gross income last year of just under $1.9 million. The senator reported making $157,352 from her congressional salary, and a net income of $320,125 from sales of her book.

The couple paid over $2.2 million in federal taxes over the past five years, according to the returns.

Harris and her husband had a higher effective tax rate for 2018 than they did in 2017, though their income was also higher.

It is possible that they are among the roughly 5 percent of households who are expected to receive a tax increase in 2018 from President Trump's tax law. The law, which all Democratic lawmakers voted against, caps the state and local tax deduction at $10,000, and Harris and her husband had about $225,000 in state and local taxes in 2018.

In 2018, Harris and her husband donated $27,259 to charity, including $5,000 to Howard University, where the senator went to college, and $20 to Wikipedia.

A number of other 2020 hopefuls, including Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharThe Hill's Morning Report - Is impeachment back on the table? New Hampshire senator to ask 2020 Dems to back repeal of state residency law Booker to supporter who wanted him to punch Trump: 'Black guys like us, we don't get away with that' MORE (D-Minn.), Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandWarren unveils plan to cancel student loan debt, create universal free college Cory Booker has a problem in 2020: Kamala Harris Booker to supporter who wanted him to punch Trump: 'Black guys like us, we don't get away with that' MORE (D-N.Y.) and Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenTrump pushes back on impeachment talk: 'Tables are finally turning on the Witch Hunt!' Warren unveils plan to cancel student loan debt, create universal free college Moulton enters 2020 White House race MORE (D-Mass.), have released their tax returns in recent weeks. Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersThe biggest challenge from the Mueller Report depends on the vigilance of everyone GOP Senate campaign arm hits battleground-state Dems over 'Medicare for All,' Green New Deal Warren unveils plan to cancel student loan debt, create universal free college MORE (I-Vt.) is expected to release his returns on Monday.

The transparency push comes amid heightened congressional efforts to force the publication of President Trump’s financial information that he has refused to release voluntarily.

Earlier this month, House Democrats requested that the IRS provide six years of Trump’s personal and business tax returns.

Treasury Secretary Steven MnuchinSteven Terner MnuchinDems plot next move in Trump tax-return battle On The Money: House Dem says marijuana banking bill will get vote in spring | Buttigieg joins striking Stop & Shop workers | US home construction slips in March | Uber gets B investment for self-driving cars Former Sears holding company sues ex-CEO, Mnuchin and others over 'asset stripping' MORE said Wednesday that the agency was still reviewing the demand and would not meet the deadline. House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard NealRichard Edmund NealDems plot next move in Trump tax-return battle Dems digging into Trump finances post-Mueller On The Money: House Dem says marijuana banking bill will get vote in spring | Buttigieg joins striking Stop & Shop workers | US home construction slips in March | Uber gets B investment for self-driving cars MORE (D-Mass.) gave the IRS a new deadline of April 23 to comply with the request.

The Trump administration has accused Democrats of using the requests to the IRS for political gain, claiming the demands do not serve a legislative purpose.

--Naomi Jagoda contributed to this report, which was updated at 10:13 a.m.