Bernie Sanders releases 10 years of tax returns

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersTop Sanders adviser: Warren isn't competing for 'same pool of voters' Eight Democratic presidential hopefuls to appear in CNN climate town hall Top aide Jeff Weaver lays out Sanders's path to victory MORE (I-Vt.) released 10 years of his tax returns on Monday as part of his 2020 presidential campaign.

The release of his returns came on the the deadline for taxpayers to file their 2018 returns.

The returns show that the adjusted gross income for Sanders and his wife, Jane, in 2018 was $561,293 and that they paid a 26 percent effective tax rate.

The returns show earnings of more than $1 million over the last two years, reflecting Sanders's recent acknowledgement that sales of his book have made him a millionaire.

In 2017, Sanders and his wife had adjusted gross income of $1,131,925 and an effective tax rate of 30.4 percent. In 2016, they had adjusted gross income $1,062,626 and an effective tax rate of 35 percent.

ADVERTISEMENT

"These tax returns show that our family has been fortunate. I am very grateful for that, as I grew up in a family that lived paycheck to paycheck and I know the stress of economic insecurity," Sanders said in a statement. "That is why I strive every day to ensure every American has the basic necessities of life, including a livable wage, decent housing, health care and retirement security."

"I consider paying more in taxes as my income rose to be both an obligation and an investment in our country. I will continue to fight to make our tax system more progressive so that our country has the resources to guarantee the American Dream to all people," Sanders added.

Sanders and his wife reported $18,950 in charitable contributions on their 2018 return. Sanders's campaign said that proceeds from one of the senator's books are also donated directly to charity, and Sanders and his wife don't claim a deduction for those donations.

Sanders released his returns minutes before he participated in a town hall on Fox News. During the program, Sanders criticized President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump pushes back on recent polling data, says internal numbers are 'strongest we've had so far' Illinois state lawmaker apologizes for photos depicting mock assassination of Trump Scaramucci assembling team of former Cabinet members to speak out against Trump MORE's 2017 tax-cut law, saying it's a "disgrace" that some corporations aren't paying anything in federal income taxes.

He also said he won't apologize for writing a best-selling book and that he's not vilifying people with a lot of money but wants to ensure that they are paying their "fair share" of taxes.

This release of Sanders's tax returns is more extensive than his disclosure during his 2016 presidential campaign. At that time, he released only his 2014 tax return.

Several other 2020 Democratic presidential candidates have also released at least 10 years of tax returns. These candidates include Sens. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisEight Democratic presidential hopefuls to appear in CNN climate town hall Biden, Buttigieg bypassing Democratic delegate meeting: report The Hill's Morning Report - Trump on defense over economic jitters MORE (D-Calif.), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharEight Democratic presidential hopefuls to appear in CNN climate town hall Biden, Buttigieg bypassing Democratic delegate meeting: report Poll: Nearly 4 in 5 say they will consider candidates' stances on cybersecurity MORE (D-Minn.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenTop Sanders adviser: Warren isn't competing for 'same pool of voters' Eight Democratic presidential hopefuls to appear in CNN climate town hall In shift, top CEOs say shareholder value not top goal MORE (D-Mass.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump on defense over economic jitters F-bombs away: Why lawmakers are cursing now more than ever White House offers reassurances amid recession fears as 2020 candidates sound alarm MORE (D-N.Y.) as well as Washington Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleeEight Democratic presidential hopefuls to appear in CNN climate town hall Andrew Yang promises mass pardon to those imprisoned for nonviolent marijuana offenses 13 states file lawsuit over Trump 'public charge' rule MORE (D). Former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeO'Rourke: Trump driving global, U.S. economy into recession 2020 Democrats feel more emboldened to label Trump a racist Hillicon Valley: O'Rourke proposal targets tech's legal shield | Dem wants public review of FCC agreement with T-Mobile, Sprint | Voters zero in on cybersecurity | Instagram to let users flag misinformation MORE (D-Texas) also released his returns on Monday, shortly after Sanders did.

In releasing their tax returns, Democratic presidential candidates are contrasting themselves with Trump, who in 2016 became the first major-party nominee in decades to not release any of his tax returns.


Max Greenwood contributed to this report, which was updated at 7:24 p.m.