SPONSORED:

Bernie Sanders releases 10 years of tax returns

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersOvernight Health Care: CDC approves Pfizer vaccine for adolescents aged 12-15 | House moderates signal concerns with Pelosi drug pricing bill | Panel blasts COVID-19 response Briahna Joy Gray: Warren not endorsing Sanders in 2020 was 'really frustrating' House moderates signal concerns with Pelosi drug pricing bill MORE (I-Vt.) released 10 years of his tax returns on Monday as part of his 2020 presidential campaign.

The release of his returns came on the the deadline for taxpayers to file their 2018 returns.

The returns show that the adjusted gross income for Sanders and his wife, Jane, in 2018 was $561,293 and that they paid a 26 percent effective tax rate.

The returns show earnings of more than $1 million over the last two years, reflecting Sanders's recent acknowledgement that sales of his book have made him a millionaire.

In 2017, Sanders and his wife had adjusted gross income of $1,131,925 and an effective tax rate of 30.4 percent. In 2016, they had adjusted gross income $1,062,626 and an effective tax rate of 35 percent.

ADVERTISEMENT

"These tax returns show that our family has been fortunate. I am very grateful for that, as I grew up in a family that lived paycheck to paycheck and I know the stress of economic insecurity," Sanders said in a statement. "That is why I strive every day to ensure every American has the basic necessities of life, including a livable wage, decent housing, health care and retirement security."

"I consider paying more in taxes as my income rose to be both an obligation and an investment in our country. I will continue to fight to make our tax system more progressive so that our country has the resources to guarantee the American Dream to all people," Sanders added.

Sanders and his wife reported $18,950 in charitable contributions on their 2018 return. Sanders's campaign said that proceeds from one of the senator's books are also donated directly to charity, and Sanders and his wife don't claim a deduction for those donations.

Sanders released his returns minutes before he participated in a town hall on Fox News. During the program, Sanders criticized President TrumpDonald TrumpWarren says Republican party 'eating itself and it is discovering that the meal is poisonous' More than 75 Asian, LGBTQ groups oppose anti-Asian crime bill McConnell says he's 'great admirer' of Liz Cheney but mum on her removal MORE's 2017 tax-cut law, saying it's a "disgrace" that some corporations aren't paying anything in federal income taxes.

He also said he won't apologize for writing a best-selling book and that he's not vilifying people with a lot of money but wants to ensure that they are paying their "fair share" of taxes.

This release of Sanders's tax returns is more extensive than his disclosure during his 2016 presidential campaign. At that time, he released only his 2014 tax return.

Several other 2020 Democratic presidential candidates have also released at least 10 years of tax returns. These candidates include Sens. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisMcConnell: 'Good chance' of deal with Biden on infrastructure Democrat Nikki Fried teases possible challenge to DeSantis Pavlich: The border crisis Biden said we could afford MORE (D-Calif.), Amy KlobucharAmy Klobuchar Klobuchar offers tribute to her father, who died Wednesday The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Cheney poised to be ousted; Biden to host big meeting Senate panel deadlocks in vote on sweeping elections bill MORE (D-Minn.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren says Republican party 'eating itself and it is discovering that the meal is poisonous' Briahna Joy Gray: Warren not endorsing Sanders in 2020 was 'really frustrating' McConnell hits Democratic critics of Israel MORE (D-Mass.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandAustin tight lipped on whether to take sexual assault cases out of commanders' hands Gillibrand touts legislation to lower drug costs: This idea 'is deeply bipartisan' A bipartisan effort to prevent the scourge of sexual assault in the armed forces MORE (D-N.Y.) as well as Washington Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleeWashington bans open carry of weapons at state capitol, public protests Washington state to provide free menstrual hygiene products in school bathrooms Cuomo signs legislation restoring voting rights to felons upon release from prison MORE (D). Former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeO'Rourke clarifies remarks, leaves door open to gubernatorial bid O'Rourke says he's not planning on run for Texas governor O'Rourke slams Cruz for video of border visit MORE (D-Texas) also released his returns on Monday, shortly after Sanders did.

In releasing their tax returns, Democratic presidential candidates are contrasting themselves with Trump, who in 2016 became the first major-party nominee in decades to not release any of his tax returns.


Max Greenwood contributed to this report, which was updated at 7:24 p.m.