More than one in 10 in new poll say men are 'better suited emotionally' for politics

More than one in ten Americans believe  men are "better suited emotionally" than most women for politics, according to a report published Tuesday. 

By 2018, 13 percent of Americans still believe that men are better suited for emotionally for politics than women, according to a Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce analysis of General Social Survey data. The survey noted that about 13 percent of both men and women shared this belief. 

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Bias against women in politics did however, differ by political affiliation. Respondents who identify "strong Republicans," regardless of sex, were nearly three times as likely as those who identified as "strong Democrats" to believe that men are better suited for politics than women by 2018, the analysis notes. 

The number of Americans who believed men were better suited for politics than women peaked in 1975, with nearly half of Americans holding this belief. The percentage of people who hold this belief has been declining since. 

Six women, Sens. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisHillicon Valley: Apple rolls out coronavirus screening app, website | Pompeo urged to crack down on coronavirus misinformation from China | Senators push FTC on price gouging | Instacart workers threaten strike Democratic Senators urge FTC to prevent coronavirus price gouging Democratic senators call on FDA to drop restrictions on blood donations from men who have sex with men MORE (D-Calif.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenHillicon Valley: Apple rolls out coronavirus screening app, website | Pompeo urged to crack down on coronavirus misinformation from China | Senators push FTC on price gouging | Instacart workers threaten strike Democratic Senators urge FTC to prevent coronavirus price gouging Democratic senators call on FDA to drop restrictions on blood donations from men who have sex with men MORE (D-Mass.), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandProgressive advocates propose T 'green stimulus' plan Juan Williams: Biden's promises on women are a big deal Cuomo steps into national spotlight with coronavirus fight MORE (D-N.Y.), and Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharHillicon Valley: Apple rolls out coronavirus screening app, website | Pompeo urged to crack down on coronavirus misinformation from China | Senators push FTC on price gouging | Instacart workers threaten strike Democratic Senators urge FTC to prevent coronavirus price gouging Democratic senators call on FDA to drop restrictions on blood donations from men who have sex with men MORE (D-Minn.) as well as Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi Gabbard20 House Dems call on Trump to issue two-week, nationwide shelter-in-place order The Hill's Morning Report — ,000,000,000,000: GOP unveils historic US rescue effort Gillibrand endorses Biden for president MORE (D-Hawaii) and author Marianne WilliamsonMarianne WilliamsonThe Hill's Campaign Report: Biden looks to stretch lead in Tuesday contests Pelosi: 'I usually always cast my vote for a woman' Pelosi: 'We'll have a woman president' someday MORE, are running for president. They are among the nearly 20 candidates who are vying for the Democratic Party's 2020 nomination.