More than one in 10 in new poll say men are 'better suited emotionally' for politics

More than one in ten Americans believe  men are "better suited emotionally" than most women for politics, according to a report published Tuesday. 

By 2018, 13 percent of Americans still believe that men are better suited for emotionally for politics than women, according to a Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce analysis of General Social Survey data. The survey noted that about 13 percent of both men and women shared this belief. 

ADVERTISEMENT

Bias against women in politics did however, differ by political affiliation. Respondents who identify "strong Republicans," regardless of sex, were nearly three times as likely as those who identified as "strong Democrats" to believe that men are better suited for politics than women by 2018, the analysis notes. 

The number of Americans who believed men were better suited for politics than women peaked in 1975, with nearly half of Americans holding this belief. The percentage of people who hold this belief has been declining since. 

Six women, Sens. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisSeven takeaways from a busy Democratic presidential campaign weekend in Iowa Fracking ban could have unintended consequence of boosting coal Poll: Voters back Medicare expansion, keeping private insurance MORE (D-Calif.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenUnited Auto Workers strike against GM poised to head into eighth day Omar: Biden not the candidate to 'tackle a lot of the systematic challenges that we have' Seven takeaways from a busy Democratic presidential campaign weekend in Iowa MORE (D-Mass.), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandNew Hampshire feels overlooked in Democratic presidential race Booker aide sounds alarm about campaign's funding O'Rourke gun confiscation talk alarms Democrats MORE (D-N.Y.), and Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharSeven takeaways from a busy Democratic presidential campaign weekend in Iowa MSNBC 'Climate in Crisis' special draws 1.3M viewers in 8 pm timeslot The two most important mental health reforms the Trump administration should consider MORE (D-Minn.) as well as Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardSeven takeaways from a busy Democratic presidential campaign weekend in Iowa New Hampshire feels overlooked in Democratic presidential race Analysis: 2020 digital spending vastly outpaces TV ads MORE (D-Hawaii) and author Marianne WilliamsonMarianne Williamson2020 Democrats defend climate priorities in MSNBC forum Overnight Energy: Trump officials formally revoke California emissions waiver | EPA's Wheeler dodges questions about targeting San Francisco over homelessness | 2020 Dems duke it out at second climate forum Williamson: Climate change result of an 'amoral' economic system MORE, are running for president. They are among the nearly 20 candidates who are vying for the Democratic Party's 2020 nomination.