More than one in 10 in new poll say men are 'better suited emotionally' for politics

More than one in ten Americans believe  men are "better suited emotionally" than most women for politics, according to a report published Tuesday. 

By 2018, 13 percent of Americans still believe that men are better suited for emotionally for politics than women, according to a Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce analysis of General Social Survey data. The survey noted that about 13 percent of both men and women shared this belief. 

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Bias against women in politics did however, differ by political affiliation. Respondents who identify "strong Republicans," regardless of sex, were nearly three times as likely as those who identified as "strong Democrats" to believe that men are better suited for politics than women by 2018, the analysis notes. 

The number of Americans who believed men were better suited for politics than women peaked in 1975, with nearly half of Americans holding this belief. The percentage of people who hold this belief has been declining since. 

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