Buttigieg releases 10 years of tax returns

Buttigieg releases 10 years of tax returns
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Democratic presidential contender Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegButtigieg: We 'probably are' on cusp of recession Chris Wallace becomes Trump era's 'equal opportunity inquisitor' Fighter pilot vs. astronaut match-up in Arizona could determine control of Senate MORE on Tuesday released his tax returns, following similar moves by his rivals as they seek to distinguish themselves from President TrumpDonald John TrumpO'Rourke: Trump driving global, U.S. economy into recession Manchin: Trump has 'golden opportunity' on gun reforms Objections to Trump's new immigration rule wildly exaggerated MORE, who has come under scrutiny for his personal finances.

Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Ind., and a rising star in the crowded Democratic primary field, released 10 years of tax returns — from 2009 to 2018 — on his campaign website

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"Mayor Pete has always played by the rules," Buttigieg's campaign said in an email. "He’s paid his fair share, and he doesn’t have a whole lot of investments, which means no conflicts of interest or corporate boards. And unlike the current president, he doesn’t have anything to hide."

Rep. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) John RyanThe Hill's Campaign Report: Battle for Senate begins to take shape Head of flight attendants group claims 'broad support' for 'Medicare for All' among union members 2020 Democrats release joint statement ahead of Trump's New Hampshire rally MORE (D-Ohio) and Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerThe Hill's Campaign Report: Battle for Senate begins to take shape Steve King to Gillibrand: Odds of me resigning same as yours of winning presidential nomination We need a climate plan for agriculture MORE (D-N.J.) are the other presidential candidates to recently disclose their personal finances publicly. 

Other candidates who have released their tax returns are Sens. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandGillibrand: Rosy economic outlook not 'reflected in everyday, kitchen-table issues families are facing' Chris Wallace becomes Trump era's 'equal opportunity inquisitor' Steve King to Gillibrand: Odds of me resigning same as yours of winning presidential nomination MORE (D-N.Y.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenPossible GOP challenger says Trump doesn't doesn't deserve reelection, but would vote for him over Democrat Joe Biden faces an uncertain path The Memo: Trump pushes back amid signs of economic slowdown MORE (D-Mass.), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharPoll: Nearly 4 in 5 say they will consider candidates' stances on cybersecurity The Hill's Campaign Report: Battle for Senate begins to take shape Native American advocates question 2020 Democrats' commitment MORE (D-Minn.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisJoe Biden faces an uncertain path Biden: 'There's an awful lot of really good Republicans out there' Fighter pilot vs. astronaut match-up in Arizona could determine control of Senate MORE (D-Calif.) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersJoe Biden faces an uncertain path Bernie Sanders vows to go to 'war with white nationalism and racism' as president Biden: 'There's an awful lot of really good Republicans out there' MORE (I-Vt.), as well as former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeO'Rourke: Trump driving global, U.S. economy into recession 2020 Democrats feel more emboldened to label Trump a racist Hillicon Valley: O'Rourke proposal targets tech's legal shield | Dem wants public review of FCC agreement with T-Mobile, Sprint | Voters zero in on cybersecurity | Instagram to let users flag misinformation MORE (D-Texas) and Washington Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleeAndrew Yang promises mass pardon to those imprisoned for nonviolent marijuana offenses 13 states file lawsuit over Trump 'public charge' rule Harris unveils plan to combat domestic terrorism MORE (D).

The candidates are releasing their tax returns in order to contrast themselves with Trump, who in 2016 became the first major-party nominee in decades to not make any of his tax returns public.

Trump has said he won't release his tax returns while under audit, though the IRS has said that nothing prevents people from releasing their own tax information.

Buttigieg's 2018 tax return shows that he and his husband, Chasten, had adjusted gross income of $152,643, and had total taxes of $20,136, for an effective tax rate of 13.2 percent. They claimed the standard deduction of $24,000.

The couple's 2018 adjusted gross income is about the same as Booker's adjusted gross income for 2018, and lower than the income reported on the 2018 returns of every other Democratic presidential candidate. Booker, who is unmarried, reported significantly less income in 2018 than he had in prior years when he had income from his book.

Buttigieg and his husband got married in 2018, so the most recent tax return is the first they filed jointly.

In 2017, Buttigieg had adjusted gross income of $133,565 — including income from his mayoral salary and from writing — and total tax of $28,830. He claimed $11,542 in itemized deductions, including $765 in charitable donations.

All of the tax returns Buttigieg released show adjusted gross income of under $200,000 for the year, and in several of the years he reported adjusted gross income of under $100,000.

In 2014, when he did not collect his mayoral salary while serving in Afghanistan, Buttigieg had adjusted gross income of $46,150. In 2011, when he first ran for mayor of South Bend, he had adjusted gross income of $7,115.

"As you can see, Pete’s not a millionaire," the Buttigieg campaign said. "He’s not funding this campaign through personal wealth, corporate PACs, or D.C. lobbyists. He’s running this campaign the same way he’s run his life — by being fair and decent."

Updated at 3:36 p.m.