Buttigieg releases 10 years of tax returns

Buttigieg releases 10 years of tax returns
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Democratic presidential contender Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegBloomberg: 'I'm going to stay right to the bitter end' of Democratic primary race The Memo: Biden seeks revival in South Carolina Delegate count unchanged after Iowa caucus recount completed MORE on Tuesday released his tax returns, following similar moves by his rivals as they seek to distinguish themselves from President TrumpDonald John TrumpThe Memo: Biden seeks revival in South Carolina Congress eyes billion to billion to combat coronavirus Sanders makes the case against Biden ahead of SC primary MORE, who has come under scrutiny for his personal finances.

Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Ind., and a rising star in the crowded Democratic primary field, released 10 years of tax returns — from 2009 to 2018 — on his campaign website

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"Mayor Pete has always played by the rules," Buttigieg's campaign said in an email. "He’s paid his fair share, and he doesn’t have a whole lot of investments, which means no conflicts of interest or corporate boards. And unlike the current president, he doesn’t have anything to hide."

Rep. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) RyanDemocrats tear into Trump's speech: It was a 'MAGA rally' Democrats walk out of Trump's address: 'It's like watching professional wrestling' Trump set to confront his impeachment foes MORE (D-Ohio) and Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerThe Memo: Biden seeks revival in South Carolina Bloomberg campaign lobbied Yang for endorsement, possible VP offer: report Warren calls for changes to presidential pardon power, pledges to create clemency board MORE (D-N.J.) are the other presidential candidates to recently disclose their personal finances publicly. 

Other candidates who have released their tax returns are Sens. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandNow is the time for a US data protection agency The Hill's Campaign Report: Warren up, Bloomberg down after brutal debate Ginsburg, accepting lifetime achievement award, urges working fathers to take an active role in kids' lives MORE (D-N.Y.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenBloomberg: 'I'm going to stay right to the bitter end' of Democratic primary race The Memo: Biden seeks revival in South Carolina Sanders holds 13-point lead in Fox News poll MORE (D-Mass.), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharSanders holds 13-point lead in Fox News poll Centrist Democrats insist Sanders would need delegate majority to win Bloomberg outspends field in Facebook ads ahead of Super Tuesday MORE (D-Minn.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisThe Memo: Biden seeks revival in South Carolina Bloomberg campaign lobbied Yang for endorsement, possible VP offer: report Biden looks to shore up lead in SC MORE (D-Calif.) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersBloomberg: 'I'm going to stay right to the bitter end' of Democratic primary race The Memo: Biden seeks revival in South Carolina Sanders makes the case against Biden ahead of SC primary MORE (I-Vt.), as well as former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeCNN signs Andrew Yang as contributor Krystal Ball: Voters are coming to their own judgements about who is electable Warren campaign to host series of events in Texas MORE (D-Texas) and Washington Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleePence talks coronavirus with Cuomo, Newsom, other governors Overnight Energy: New Interior rule would limit scientific studies agency can consider | Panel battles over tree-planting bill | Trump to resume coal leases on public lands Andrew Yang ends presidential bid MORE (D).

The candidates are releasing their tax returns in order to contrast themselves with Trump, who in 2016 became the first major-party nominee in decades to not make any of his tax returns public.

Trump has said he won't release his tax returns while under audit, though the IRS has said that nothing prevents people from releasing their own tax information.

Buttigieg's 2018 tax return shows that he and his husband, Chasten, had adjusted gross income of $152,643, and had total taxes of $20,136, for an effective tax rate of 13.2 percent. They claimed the standard deduction of $24,000.

The couple's 2018 adjusted gross income is about the same as Booker's adjusted gross income for 2018, and lower than the income reported on the 2018 returns of every other Democratic presidential candidate. Booker, who is unmarried, reported significantly less income in 2018 than he had in prior years when he had income from his book.

Buttigieg and his husband got married in 2018, so the most recent tax return is the first they filed jointly.

In 2017, Buttigieg had adjusted gross income of $133,565 — including income from his mayoral salary and from writing — and total tax of $28,830. He claimed $11,542 in itemized deductions, including $765 in charitable donations.

All of the tax returns Buttigieg released show adjusted gross income of under $200,000 for the year, and in several of the years he reported adjusted gross income of under $100,000.

In 2014, when he did not collect his mayoral salary while serving in Afghanistan, Buttigieg had adjusted gross income of $46,150. In 2011, when he first ran for mayor of South Bend, he had adjusted gross income of $7,115.

"As you can see, Pete’s not a millionaire," the Buttigieg campaign said. "He’s not funding this campaign through personal wealth, corporate PACs, or D.C. lobbyists. He’s running this campaign the same way he’s run his life — by being fair and decent."

Updated at 3:36 p.m.