Buttigieg releases 10 years of tax returns

Buttigieg releases 10 years of tax returns
© Getty Images

Democratic presidential contender Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegButtigieg campaign field organizers unionize Harris: Buttigieg comparing 'struggles' between black, LGBTQ communities is 'a bit naive' Poll: Trump edges Biden, trails Sanders in neck and neck match-ups MORE on Tuesday released his tax returns, following similar moves by his rivals as they seek to distinguish themselves from President TrumpDonald John TrumpWatergate prosecutor says that Sondland testimony was 'tipping point' for Trump In private moment with Trump, Justice Kennedy pushed for Kavanaugh Supreme Court nomination: book Obama: 'Everybody needs to chill out' about differences between 2020 candidates MORE, who has come under scrutiny for his personal finances.

Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Ind., and a rising star in the crowded Democratic primary field, released 10 years of tax returns — from 2009 to 2018 — on his campaign website

ADVERTISEMENT

"Mayor Pete has always played by the rules," Buttigieg's campaign said in an email. "He’s paid his fair share, and he doesn’t have a whole lot of investments, which means no conflicts of interest or corporate boards. And unlike the current president, he doesn’t have anything to hide."

Rep. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) RyanMore than 100 Democrats sign letter calling for Stephen Miller to resign Debate crowd erupts in laughs as Sanders chimes in 'I wrote the damn bill' on Medicare for All The Hill's Campaign Report: Late bids surprise 2020 Democratic field MORE (D-Ohio) and Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerBooker hits fundraising threshold for December debate after surge of post-debate donations Bicameral group of Democrats introduces bill to protect immigrant laborers The Hill's Morning Report - Sondland stuns; Dems pull punches in fifth debate MORE (D-N.J.) are the other presidential candidates to recently disclose their personal finances publicly. 

Other candidates who have released their tax returns are Sens. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandBooker hits fundraising threshold for December debate after surge of post-debate donations Maloney primary challenger calls on her to return, donate previous campaign donations from Trump Senate confirms controversial circuit court nominee MORE (D-N.Y.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenKamala Harris receives new Iowa endorsements after debate performance Warren speech in Georgia interrupted by pro-charter school protesters Hillicon Valley: Senators ask Trump to halt Huawei licenses | Warren criticizes Zuckerberg over secret dinner with Trump | Senior DHS cyber official to leave | Dems offer bill on Libra oversight MORE (D-Mass.), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharA free college tradeoff — what should the 2020 candidates promise? Booker hits fundraising threshold for December debate after surge of post-debate donations The Hill's Morning Report - Sondland stuns; Dems pull punches in fifth debate MORE (D-Minn.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisKamala Harris receives new Iowa endorsements after debate performance On The Money: Trump signs short-term spending bill to avoid shutdown | Pelosi casts doubt on USMCA deal in 2019 | California high court strikes down law targeting Trump tax returns Democratic strategist laments 'low bar' for Biden debate performance MORE (D-Calif.) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersKamala Harris receives new Iowa endorsements after debate performance Wasserman Schultz makes bid for House Appropriations Committee gavel Overnight Health Care: Crunch time for Congress on surprise medical bills | CDC confirms 47 vaping-related deaths | Massachusetts passes flavored tobacco, vaping products ban MORE (I-Vt.), as well as former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeDeval Patrick enters 2020 race O'Rourke says he 'absolutely' plans to stay in politics Krystal Ball: Buttigieg is 'the boomer candidate' MORE (D-Texas) and Washington Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleeO'Rourke ends presidential bid Sunrise Movement organizer: Sanders, Warren boast strongest climate change plans Overnight Energy: Farmers say EPA reneged on ethanol deal | EPA scrubs senators' quotes from controversial ethanol announcement | Perry unsure if he'll comply with subpoena | John Kerry criticizes lack of climate talk at debate MORE (D).

The candidates are releasing their tax returns in order to contrast themselves with Trump, who in 2016 became the first major-party nominee in decades to not make any of his tax returns public.

Trump has said he won't release his tax returns while under audit, though the IRS has said that nothing prevents people from releasing their own tax information.

Buttigieg's 2018 tax return shows that he and his husband, Chasten, had adjusted gross income of $152,643, and had total taxes of $20,136, for an effective tax rate of 13.2 percent. They claimed the standard deduction of $24,000.

The couple's 2018 adjusted gross income is about the same as Booker's adjusted gross income for 2018, and lower than the income reported on the 2018 returns of every other Democratic presidential candidate. Booker, who is unmarried, reported significantly less income in 2018 than he had in prior years when he had income from his book.

Buttigieg and his husband got married in 2018, so the most recent tax return is the first they filed jointly.

In 2017, Buttigieg had adjusted gross income of $133,565 — including income from his mayoral salary and from writing — and total tax of $28,830. He claimed $11,542 in itemized deductions, including $765 in charitable donations.

All of the tax returns Buttigieg released show adjusted gross income of under $200,000 for the year, and in several of the years he reported adjusted gross income of under $100,000.

In 2014, when he did not collect his mayoral salary while serving in Afghanistan, Buttigieg had adjusted gross income of $46,150. In 2011, when he first ran for mayor of South Bend, he had adjusted gross income of $7,115.

"As you can see, Pete’s not a millionaire," the Buttigieg campaign said. "He’s not funding this campaign through personal wealth, corporate PACs, or D.C. lobbyists. He’s running this campaign the same way he’s run his life — by being fair and decent."

Updated at 3:36 p.m.