De Blasio launches presidential campaign

New York City Mayor Bill de BlasioBill de Blasio2020 Democrats join striking McDonald's workers Biden only Democrat with strong positive favorability numbers: poll CNN forces de Blasio to watch late-night comics ridicule him MORE (D) launched his presidential campaign on Thursday, joining a crowded field of Democratic contenders.

“Donald Trump must be stopped,” he said in a video announcing the launch of his campaign. “I’ve beaten him before and I’ll do it again.”

De Blasio is the 24th candidate to jump into the Democratic primary race and faces a challenging path to winning the nomination. More established progressive rivals such as Sens. Bernie SandersBernie Sanders2020 Democrats join striking McDonald's workers Billionaire's M gift to Morehouse grads points way to student debt solution Poll: Nearly half of Clinton's former supporters back Biden MORE (I-Vt.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenThe Hill's Morning Report — After contentious week, Trump heads for Japan On The Money: Senate passes disaster aid bill after deal with Trump | Trump to offer B aid package for farmers | House votes to boost retirement savings | Study says new tariffs to double costs for consumers Overnight Energy: Democrats ask if EPA chief misled on vehicle emissions | Dem senators want NBC debate focused on climate change | 2020 hopeful John Delaney unveils T climate plan MORE (D-Mass.) have already been campaigning — and raising money — for months.

The New York mayor barely shows up in most polls and faces opposition back in his home city to his presidential run. A survey from Quinnipiac University Poll released last month showed 76 percent of the city's residents think he should not run for president. 

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De Blasio has been telegraphing a presidential run for months and has already made trips to crucial early primary states Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada.

He argues the progressive policies he's championed in New York, including an expansion of health care and free prekindergarten, can work on a national scale.  

"There's plenty of money in this world, there's plenty of money in this country, it's just in the wrong hands," he said in the campaign video.

After his announcement, de Blasio appeared on ABC's "Good Morning America," where he ripped into President TrumpDonald John TrumpNASA exec leading moon mission quits weeks after appointment The Hill's Morning Report — After contentious week, Trump heads for Japan Frustration boils over with Senate's 'legislative graveyard' MORE

“I call him Con Don. Every New Yorker knows he’s a con artist. We know his tricks. We know his playbook,” de Blasio said. “I know how to take him on — I’ve been watching him for decades. He’s trying to convince working Americans he’s on their side. It’s been a lie from day one.”

Trump swiftly hit back, saying de Blasio was a "JOKE."

“The Dems are getting another beauty to join their group. Bill de Blasio of NYC, considered the worst mayor in the U.S., will supposedly be making an announcement for president today. He is a JOKE, but if you like high taxes & crime, he’s your man. NYC HATES HIM!” Trump tweeted. 

Trump is a frequent target for the New York mayor, who on Monday held a news conference in Trump Tower, where he promoted new regulations curbing energy use by buildings in the city.

At the briefing, de Blasio said the Trump Organization could face fines of around $2 million per year starting in 2030 if its buildings do not reduce their carbon emissions.

De Blasio was heckled by Trump supporters during his appearance and then engaged in a heated exchange over Twitter with Eric TrumpEric Frederick TrumpTrump family members will join state visit to UK New financial disclosure forms provide glimpses of Trump's wealth De Blasio blasts Trump as he launches 2020 bid: 'Every New Yorker knows he's a con artist' MORE, the president's son, who attacked the mayor's leadership of the city.

“Bill de Blasio is a liberal extremist who wants the government to control everything from your health care to what you eat," Republican National Committee spokesman Michael Ahrens said in a statement shortly after de Blasio launched his campaign. "Americans can rest assured that he won't win, but unfortunately his socialist policies fit right in with the rest of his comrades in the race.”

De Blasio's late entry to the race will present a series of challenges, at a time when even once-rising stars such as former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeButtiegieg backs NFL players' right to protest during anthem: I 'put my life on the line to defend' that Overnight Energy: Democrats ask if EPA chief misled on vehicle emissions | Dem senators want NBC debate focused on climate change | 2020 hopeful John Delaney unveils T climate plan CNN's O'Rourke town hall finishes behind Fox News, MSNBC MORE (D-Texas) are struggling to emerge from the crowded Democratic pack. 

The New York mayor could also initially struggle to land a spot on the primary debate due to kick off late next month.

To qualify for the 12 scheduled Democratic primary debates, candidates must receive at least 1 percent support in at least three separate polls recognized by the Democratic National Committee (DNC) or receive campaign contributions from at least 65,000 unique donors.

The DNC has said that it will prioritize candidates who meet both thresholds if more than 20 contenders qualify for the debates. 

Updated at 9:47 a.m.

Read more from The Hill:

De Blasio blasts Trump as he launches 2020 bid: 'Every New Yorker knows he's a con artist'

Trump rips de Blasio 2020 bid: 'He is a JOKE'

WHIP LIST: Who's in and out in the 2020 race