Biden, Sanders tied atop new Iowa poll

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenSenate gears up for battle over witnesses in impeachment trial Conservative group hits White House with billboard ads: 'What is Trump hiding?' Democrat representing Pennsylvania district Trump carried plans to vote to impeach  MORE and Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSaagar Enjeti says Buttigieg's release of McKinsey client list shows he 'caved to public pressure' Sanders endorses Young Turks founder Cenk Uygur for Katie Hill's former House seat Biden hires Clinton, O'Rourke alum as campaign's digital director MORE (I-Vt.) are tied atop the field of Democratic presidential hopefuls in Iowa, according to a new poll, suggesting that the crucial first-in-the-nation caucus state is still in play for both men.

An Iowa Starting Line/Change Research poll released on Monday shows Biden and Sanders each receiving 24 percent support among likely Democratic caucusgoers in Iowa.

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They’re trailed by South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegSaagar Enjeti says Buttigieg's release of McKinsey client list shows he 'caved to public pressure' Biden hires Clinton, O'Rourke alum as campaign's digital director Trump neck and neck with top 2020 Democrats in Wisconsin: poll MORE, who received 14 percent of the vote, Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenSaagar Enjeti says Buttigieg's release of McKinsey client list shows he 'caved to public pressure' On The Money: Lawmakers strike spending deal | US, China reach limited trade deal ahead of tariff deadline | Lighthizer fails to quell GOP angst over new NAFTA Bill Weld: As many as six GOP senators privately support convicting Trump MORE (D-Mass.), who came in fourth with 12 percent, and Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisOvernight Health Care — Presented by That's Medicaid — House passes sweeping Pelosi bill to lower drug prices | Senate confirms Trump FDA pick | Trump officials approve Medicaid work requirements in South Carolina Sanders endorses Young Turks founder Cenk Uygur for Katie Hill's former House seat Kamala Harris dropped out, but let's keep her mental health plan alive MORE (D-Calif.) who also had double figures at 10 percent support.

The tie between Biden and Sanders in the Hawkeye State differs from most recent national polling results that have shown the former vice president trouncing his competition, often by double digits.

A Fox News survey released last week, for instance, showed Biden with an 18-point lead over Sanders, the poll’s second-place finisher. And a recent left-leaning poll of South Carolina voters, an important Democratic primary state, showed Biden leading Sanders by more than 30 points.

The Iowa poll, however, shows a much closer race between Biden and Sanders for the all-important opening caucus.

The former vice president has double the support of Sanders among voters 65 and older — 30 percent to 15 percent, according to the Iowa Starting Line/Change Research poll. But Sanders carries a significant lead over Biden among voters between the ages of 18 and 31 — 41 percent compared to Biden’s 9 percent.

Meanwhile, Biden outperforms Sanders among female voters, according to the poll, taking 26 percent support compared to Sanders’s 19 percent. Sanders, however, has more backing from male voters, 29 percent of whom say they plan to support the Vermont senator in 2020. Biden has 21 percent support among men.

To be sure, the Iowa caucuses are still nine months away, and caucusgoers in the state are often wary to commit too early to any particular candidate.

Still, Sanders performed well there in 2016, coming in a close second to Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBiden hires Clinton, O'Rourke alum as campaign's digital director Trump neck and neck with top 2020 Democrats in Wisconsin: poll Clinton tweets impeachment website, encourages voters to 'see the evidence for themselves' MORE in the caucuses that year. The Iowa Starting Line/Change Research poll released Monday found that 45 percent of those who caucused for Sanders in 2016 still say that the Vermont senator is their first choice in 2020.

The poll surveyed 615 likely Democratic caucusgoers in Iowa from May 15-19. It was a margin of error of 3.9 percentage points.