Warren invokes Obama, Trump when asked about electability

Warren invokes Obama, Trump when asked about electability
© Greg Nash

Democratic presidential hopeful Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenTrump preps conspiracy theory to explain faltering economy Sanders, Warren back major shift to fight drug overdoses Rendell: Biden 'baked in' as Democratic nominee MORE (D-Mass.) invoked President TrumpDonald John TrumpGraham: America must 'accept the pain that comes in standing up to China' Weld 'thrilled' more Republicans are challenging Trump New data challenges Trump's economic narrative MORE and former President Obama at an Indiana town hall on Wednesday when asked whether she was electable enough to beat Trump. 

"You know, I remember when people said Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaNew data challenges Trump's economic narrative Trump preps conspiracy theory to explain faltering economy The ideological divide on vaping has a clear winner: Smokers MORE couldn’t be elected. I remember when people said Donald Trump couldn’t be elected, and here we are," Warren told MSNBC's Chris Hayes at a town hall in Fort Wayne, Ind. 

"Elections are about getting in there and fighting for it," she continued. "I got in this race because an America that keeps working better and better and better for a thinner slice at the top isn’t going to work. We can’t sustain this." 

"I’m in this fight to make this America, to make this government in Washington, work for everyone. That’s my job. That’s why I’m here," she said. 

The progressive senator dived deep into her policy proposals on Wednesday, a strategy that appears to have benefited her in the packed Democratic primary. 

A Morning Consult survey released on Tuesday showed Warren breaking double digits at 10 percent, while her progressive rival Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersTrump preps conspiracy theory to explain faltering economy Sanders doubles down on 'Medicare For All' defense: 'We have not changed one word' Sanders, Warren back major shift to fight drug overdoses MORE's (I-Vt.) support fell 1 point to 19 percent. 

Warren has introduced a series of policy-specific plans, including a proposal to invest $2 trillion in green research, manufacturing and exporting green energy technology.