Bullock introduces plan to keep foreign money out of US elections

Bullock introduces plan to keep foreign money out of US elections

Montana Gov. Steve BullockSteve BullockFundraising numbers highlight growing divide in 2020 race Inslee raises over million in second quarter Moulton: Trump voters 'know that he's an a--hole' MORE (D), who is running for president, released a plan Wednesday evening to keep foreign money from being donated to candidates in U.S. elections.

Bullock’s “Check the Box” proposal would add a checkbox to IRS and Federal Election Commission forms that super PACs and so-called dark money groups must fill in to certify they are not using foreign money in their political contributions. Dark money groups are not required to disclose their donors. 

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“Ridding foreign money from American elections could be as simple as checking a box,” Bullock said in a press release. “There can be no free passes for those deliberately seeking to undermine our democracy.” 

“‘Check the Box’ is a small, yet powerful tool to fight back against the corrupting influence of foreign money in American politics, and will ensure that our government represents one thing: the voice of every American.” 

Under Bullock’s plan, corporate officers could face up to 10 years behind bars and a $250,000 fine for lying on the forms.

The plan is part of the Montana Democrat’s overarching policy of getting “big money out of politics,” which would ban super PACs, empower watchdogs to enforce campaign finance laws and work to overturn the Citizens United Supreme Court decision that lifted restrictions on campaign donations from corporations.

Bullock also launched a lawsuit Wednesday against the Trump administration over a rule saying dark money groups do not have to disclose the source of their funds. He sent out a series of tweets bashing the White House that were partially blacked out to protest the “dark money loophole.”

Bullock announced his presidential campaign last month with an emphasis on increasing transparency in campaign donations, underlining a 2015 Montana bill he signed into law requiring dark money groups to report how they spend money in state elections.