Dems get behind businesswoman challenging Joni Ernst

Dems get behind businesswoman challenging Joni Ernst
© Stefani Reynolds

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) is backing businesswoman Theresa Greenfield (D) in her bid to challenge Sen. Joni ErnstJoni Kay ErnstThe Hill's 12:30 Report - Speculation over Biden's running mate announcement Davis: The Hall of Shame for GOP senators who remain silent on Donald Trump Lincoln Project expands GOP target list, winning Trump ire MORE (R-Iowa), an early finger on the scale for a candidate who will first have to clear a Democratic primary.

Greenfield, who briefly ran for a seat in Congress now held by Rep. Cindy AxneCindy AxneHouse Democrats target Midwestern GOP seats Democrats go big on diversity with new House recruits Prioritizing access to care: Keeping telehealth options for all Americans MORE (D-Iowa), announced earlier this week she would challenge the Republican first-time senator.

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In a statement, DSCC Chairwoman Catherine Cortez MastoCatherine Marie Cortez MastoOcasio-Cortez to speak at Democratic convention Senate Democrats demand answers on migrant child trafficking during pandemic OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Trump signs major conservation bill into law | Senate votes to confirm Energy's No. 2 official | Trump Jr. expresses opposition to Pebble Mine project MORE (D-Nev.) said Greenfield was the best fit for the state.

“Growing up on her family’s farm, Theresa learned early on that when a job needs to get done, it doesn’t matter who you are — you need to step up and complete the task,” Cortez Masto said. “Theresa’s proven she’s not afraid of a challenge.”

EMILY’s List also said Thursday it would back Greenfield, giving her access to early money from the group’s list of big and small donors alike.

She won quick endorsements from three state senators, two state representatives and prominent Democratic leaders including former state party chairs Sue Dvorsky and Andy McGuire.

Two other candidates, attorney Kimberly Graham (D) and insurance broker Eddie Mauro (D), who also ran for Congress in 2018, are already in the race.

Greenfield is making her first run for statewide office after her 2018 campaign for Congress floundered.

Days before a key filing deadline, Greenfield withdrew her petition to get on the ballot after she discovered her then-campaign manager had falsified voter signatures. Greenfield was unable to muster the necessary signatures before the filing deadline, and she dropped out.

The eventual Democratic nominee will face a tall order in unseating Ernst, who won her seat with 52 percent of the vote in 2014. Fifty-seven percent of Iowa voters said they approved of Ernst’s job performance in a February poll conducted by veteran pollster J. Ann Selzer.

And Iowa is a key state on President TrumpDonald John TrumpNew Bob Woodward book will include details of 25 personal letters between Trump and Kim Jong Un On The Money: Pelosi, Mnuchin talk but make no progress on ending stalemate | Trump grabs 'third rail' of politics with payroll tax pause | Trump uses racist tropes to pitch fair housing repeal to 'suburban housewife' Biden commemorates anniversary of Charlottesville 'Unite the Right' rally: 'We are in a battle for the soul of our nation' MORE’s path to 270 electoral votes. He won Iowa by nearly 150,000 votes in 2016, a margin of almost 10 percentage points.