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Steyer group targeting 12 congressional Democrats over impeachment

Steyer group targeting 12 congressional Democrats over impeachment
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Liberal activist Tom SteyerTom SteyerGOP targets ballot initiatives after progressive wins On The Trail: The political losers of 2020 Biden Cabinet picks largely unify Democrats — so far MORE's Need to Impeach campaign on Monday announced it will target 12 House districts in an effort to take aim at Democrats who do not yet support impeaching President TrumpDonald TrumpProsecutors focus Trump Organization probe on company's financial officer: report WHO official says it's 'premature' to think pandemic will be over by end of year Romney released from hospital after fall over the weekend MORE

Democratic presidential hopeful Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellDemocrats don't trust GOP on 1/6 commission: 'These people are dangerous' The Memo: New riot footage stuns Trump trial New security video shows lawmakers fleeing during Capitol riot MORE (D-Calif.), House Majority Whip James Clyburn (D-S.C.) and House Oversight Committee Chairman Elijah CummingsElijah Eugene CummingsBottom line House Democrats reintroduce bill to reduce lobbyist influence Trump voters and progressives have a lot in common — and Biden can unite them MORE (D-Md.) are among those whose districts will be targeted. 

The other Democrats whose districts are on the list are Rep. Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Sekou JeffriesHarris holds first meeting in ceremonial office with CBC members Democratic fury with GOP explodes in House Congressional Black Caucus unveils '100 Day Plan' MORE (D-N.Y.), Rep. Nita LoweyNita Sue LoweyTrump seeks to freeze .4 billion of programs in final week of presidency This week: Trump's grip on Hill allies faces test Trump signs .3T relief, spending package MORE (D-N.Y.), Rep. Ben Ray Luján (D-N.M.), Rep. Debbie DingellDeborah (Debbie) Ann DingellMichigan Democrat Dingell on violent rhetoric: 'I've had men in front of my house with assault weapons' Dingell 'very concerned' about lowering threshold for stimulus Existing technology can eliminate drunk driving MORE (D-Mich.), Rep. Debbie Mucarsel-PowellDebbie Mucarsel-PowellTrump, Florida complicate Biden approach to Cuba The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Mastercard - Coast-to-coast fears about post-holiday COVID-19 spread The Memo: Democrats see warning signs beyond 2020 MORE (D-Fla.), Rep. Kathy CastorKatherine (Kathy) Anne CastorLawmakers wager barbecue, sweets and crab claws ahead of Super Bowl Biden recommits US to Paris climate accord OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Senate majority offers Biden new avenues on Trump environmental rollbacks | Democrats eye action on range of climate bills | Biden pushing to cancel Keystone XL pipeline as soon as he takes office: reports MORE (D-Fla.), Rep. Lou CorreaJose (Lou) Luis CorreaRep. Lou Correa tests positive for COVID-19 An attack on America that's divided Congress — and a nation FAA: No more warnings for unruly passengers on flights MORE (D-Calif.), Rep. Mark TakanoMark Allan TakanoK Street navigates virtual inauguration week Hoyer calls on VA Secretary Wilkie to resign after watchdog report Pelosi calls on Wilkie to resign from VA after watchdog report findings MORE (D-Calif.), and Rep. Tony CardenasAntonio (Tony) CardenasMORE (D-Calif.). 

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The campaign, which said it will spend $360,000 in the first weeks of the initiative, plans to roll out a series of digital advertisements, billboards, events and outreach programs to local officials in the districts.

Though calls for impeachment have grown among some progressive Democrats, Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiRepublican Ohio Senate candidate calls on GOP rep to resign over impeachment vote Clinton, Pelosi holding online Women's Day fundraiser with Chrissy Teigen, Amanda Gorman What good are the intelligence committees? MORE (D-Calif.) has sought to temper impeachment efforts, arguing it could backfire on the party heading into 2020.

Swalwell has not called for Trump's impeachment publicly but said last week that "we're ultimately ending up there," while Cummings said in April that impeachment proceedings against Trump were a possibility after the release of special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerWhy a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel CNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump MORE's report on the Russia probe. 

Clyburn said earlier this month that he believed Trump would be impeached "at some point" but later walked back the remarks, saying he was "probably farther away from impeachment than anybody in our caucus." 

The focus on impeachment among some Democrats comes as Mueller effectively punted the issue to Congress, saying charging Trump with obstruction of justice was "not an option" for him during his 22-month investigation.