Sarah Sanders says internal polling apparently showing Trump trailing Biden isn't 'right'

White House press secretary Sarah HuckabeeSarah Elizabeth SandersApril Ryan on 'farewell drinks' for Sarah Sanders: 'I won't be there!' Huckabee downplays daughter Sarah Sanders's 'imminent' run for Arkansas governor Time magazine: Trump threatened reporter with prison time MORE Sanders said Tuesday that she doesn't believe internal polling showing President TrumpDonald John TrumpConway defends herself against Hatch Act allegations amid threat of subpoena How to defuse Gulf tensions and avoid war with Iran Trump says 'stubborn child' Fed 'blew it' by not cutting rates MORE trailing former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden, Eastland and rejecting the cult of civility Inslee unveils plan to fight fossil fuel pollution Biden lays out immigration priorities, rips Trump for 'assault on dignity' MORE in a hypothetical 2020 race.

"I think the polling got it completely wrong in 2016, I don't think it's right now," Sanders told reporters.  

"The president's got a great story and we feel very comfortable about where we are," she added, touting the president's work on trade deals, the economy and military.

ADVERTISEMENT

"I'm not worried about polling," she said when pressed about the internal polls. "The president has an incredible record, he's had tremendous success and we feel very comfortable about where we are as an administration."

The New York Times reported Monday that Trump told aides to deny that internal polls showed him lagging behind Biden in key states. When the polling was leaked, Trump told aides to tell reporters that other data showed him doing better, according to the newspaper. 

A Trump campaign official denied this, telling The Hill in a Tuesday statement that “no one has ever asked us to lie about anything."

Polls released last week found that Trump was trailing Biden, the Democratic front-runner, in states including Texas, which Democrats haven't won since 1976, and Michigan, which Trump narrowly won in 2016.

Two dozen candidates are vying for the 2020 Democratic nomination.