Biden, Sanders, Buttigieg to debate; Warren on separate night

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenKamala Harris receives new Iowa endorsements after debate performance Watergate prosecutor says that Sondland testimony was 'tipping point' for Trump Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Deal on defense bill proves elusive | Hill, Holmes offer damaging testimony | Trump vows to block Navy from ousting officer from SEALs MORE will face off against Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersKamala Harris receives new Iowa endorsements after debate performance Wasserman Schultz makes bid for House Appropriations Committee gavel Overnight Health Care: Crunch time for Congress on surprise medical bills | CDC confirms 47 vaping-related deaths | Massachusetts passes flavored tobacco, vaping products ban MORE (I-Vt.) and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegButtigieg campaign field organizers unionize Harris: Buttigieg comparing 'struggles' between black, LGBTQ communities is 'a bit naive' Poll: Trump edges Biden, trails Sanders in neck and neck match-ups MORE on the second night of the initial Democratic presidential debates this month, with Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenKamala Harris receives new Iowa endorsements after debate performance Warren speech in Georgia interrupted by pro-charter school protesters Hillicon Valley: Senators ask Trump to halt Huawei licenses | Warren criticizes Zuckerberg over secret dinner with Trump | Senior DHS cyber official to leave | Dems offer bill on Libra oversight MORE (D-Mass.) appearing on the first night, NBC News announced Friday.

This arrangement would leave Warren as the only top-tier candidate on stage the first night of the debates on June 26, denying her a chance to go head to head with her chief rivals, Biden and Sanders, at a time when her campaign appears ascendant.

Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisKamala Harris receives new Iowa endorsements after debate performance On The Money: Trump signs short-term spending bill to avoid shutdown | Pelosi casts doubt on USMCA deal in 2019 | California high court strikes down law targeting Trump tax returns Democratic strategist laments 'low bar' for Biden debate performance MORE (D-Calif.) will also be in the debate with Biden and Sanders on June 27, the second night of the debate.

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The lineup sets up what is almost certain to be a heated showdown on the second night of the debates, pitting four of the highest-profile Democratic presidential hopefuls against one another in a two-hour spectacle.

Aside from Biden, Sanders, Buttigieg and Harris, the second-night lineup includes Sens. Michael BennetMichael Farrand Bennet2020 primary debate guide: Everything you need to know ahead of the November forum Fox News anchor apologizes for saying Booker dropped out of 2020 race Klobuchar unveils plan to secure elections as president MORE (D-Colo.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandBooker hits fundraising threshold for December debate after surge of post-debate donations Maloney primary challenger calls on her to return, donate previous campaign donations from Trump Senate confirms controversial circuit court nominee MORE (D-N.Y.), as well as Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellTrump attacks Fox News for interviewing Swalwell Live coverage: Schiff closes with speech highlighting claims of Trump's corruption The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Johnson & Johnson — Vindman defends witnesses from 'cowardly' attacks at third day of hearings MORE (D-Calif.), former Colorado Gov. John HickenlooperJohn Hickenlooper2020 hopes rise for gun control groups after Virginia elections Krystal Ball dismisses Rahm Emanuel's 'Medicare for All' criticism as a 'corporatist mantra' Trump says remark about Colorado border wall was made 'kiddingly' MORE, best-selling author Marianne WilliamsonMarianne WilliamsonThe Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Johnson & Johnson — Witness dismisses 'fictional' GOP claims of Ukraine meddling 2020 primary debate guide: Everything you need to know ahead of the November forum 2020 Democrats demand action on guns after Santa Clarita shooting MORE and tech entrepreneur Andrew YangAndrew YangPoll: Biden and Sanders tied nationally, followed by Warren The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Johnson & Johnson — Witness dismisses 'fictional' GOP claims of Ukraine meddling Yang says white supremacist violence should be designated domestic terrorism MORE.

There’s still a silver lining for Warren, the highest-profile candidate in the first night of the debates. Her spot means that she won’t have to compete for attention with other front-runners, potentially amplifying her voice on stage.

Also debating on the first night are former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-Texas), Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerBooker hits fundraising threshold for December debate after surge of post-debate donations Bicameral group of Democrats introduces bill to protect immigrant laborers The Hill's Morning Report - Sondland stuns; Dems pull punches in fifth debate MORE (D-N.J.), former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro, New York City Mayor Bill de BlasioBill de BlasioBooker hits fundraising threshold for December debate after surge of post-debate donations De Blasio knocks Bloomberg over stop and frisk apology Deval Patrick enters 2020 race MORE, Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardDemocratic strategist laments 'low bar' for Biden debate performance Harris: Buttigieg comparing 'struggles' between black, LGBTQ communities is 'a bit naive' A forgettable debate for an exhausted nation MORE (D-Hawaii), Washington Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleeO'Rourke ends presidential bid Sunrise Movement organizer: Sanders, Warren boast strongest climate change plans Overnight Energy: Farmers say EPA reneged on ethanol deal | EPA scrubs senators' quotes from controversial ethanol announcement | Perry unsure if he'll comply with subpoena | John Kerry criticizes lack of climate talk at debate MORE, former Rep. John DelaneyJohn Kevin Delaney2020 primary debate guide: Everything you need to know ahead of the November forum Poll: Biden holds 20-point lead in South Carolina Deval Patrick: a short runway, but potential to get airborne MORE (D-Md.), Rep. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) RyanMore than 100 Democrats sign letter calling for Stephen Miller to resign Debate crowd erupts in laughs as Sanders chimes in 'I wrote the damn bill' on Medicare for All The Hill's Campaign Report: Late bids surprise 2020 Democratic field MORE (D-Ohio) and Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharA free college tradeoff — what should the 2020 candidates promise? Booker hits fundraising threshold for December debate after surge of post-debate donations The Hill's Morning Report - Sondland stuns; Dems pull punches in fifth debate MORE (D-Minn.).

With the lineup made public, candidates can now begin tailoring their debate performances with specific opponents in mind.

To qualify for the first debate, presidential hopefuls had to either collect contributions from at least 65,000 unique donors, including 200 in 20 different states, or notch at least 1 percent support in three polls.

The Democratic National Committee announced on Thursday that 20 of the 24 Democrats running for president ultimately met at least one of those requirements, including 14 who met both.

The four candidates who failed to make the debate stage later this month were: Montana Gov. Steve BullockSteve Bullock2020 primary debate guide: Everything you need to know ahead of the November forum Deval Patrick: a short runway, but potential to get airborne Biden, Buttigieg condemn rocket attacks on Israel MORE, Rep. Seth MoultonSeth MoultonPardoning war crimes dishonors the military The Hill's Morning Report - Fallout from day one of Trump impeachment hearing We still owe LGBT veterans for their patriotism and service MORE (D-Mass.), former Sen. Mike Gravel (D-Alaska) and Miramar, Fla., Mayor Wayne MessamWayne Martin MessamWayne Messam suspends Democratic presidential campaign 2020 primary debate guide: Everything you need to know ahead of the November forum The Memo: What the leading 2020 Dems need to do MORE.

The order for the debates was decided on Friday with a random drawing at NBC headquarters in New York. The candidates with polling averages of at least 2 percent were split between the two nights along with candidates with lower polling averages.

Updated at 1:22 p.m.