Evangelical leader promises 'most ambitious' voter mobilization in community's history for Trump

Evangelical leader promises 'most ambitious' voter mobilization in community's history for Trump
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Ralph Reed, head of the Faith and Freedom Coalition, promised the “most ambitious and far-reaching voter mobilization effort” in the evangelical community’s history as it rallies in support of President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump endorses former White House physician Ronny Jackson for Congress Newly released emails reveal officials' panic over loss of credibility after Trump's Dorian claims Lindsey Graham thanks Trump, bemoans 'never-ending bull----' at South Carolina rally  MORE’s reelection campaign, The Washington Times reports.

Reed said plans are in the works to register 1 million evangelical voters, knock on 3 million doors and put literature in more than 117,000 churches in key states. He hopes to contact roughly 30 million people in the effort, the Times reports.

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“It’s going to be roughly three times the level of what we did in 2016,” he said.

Roughly 80 percent of self-identified white, born-again or evangelical Christians said they voted for Trump in the 2016 presidential election, according to the Pew Research Center.

More than two years into his presidency, this group still overwhelmingly continues to support him. As of March, 69 percent of white evangelical Protestants said they approved of how Trump is handling his time in office, according to Pew.

Democratic presidential candidates, including South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegOvernight Energy: Trump sued over Pentagon funds for border wall | Lawsuit warns wall will have 'devastating' effect on environment | Judge voids oil, gas leases on 1M acres of public lands The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden looks to South Carolina to turn around campaign On the ground at CPAC: Republicans see Sanders as formidable foe MORE, have slammed evangelical Christians for supporting Trump. Buttigieg labeled it “hypocrisy,” adding that Trump’s actions don’t line up with what he hears in church or reads in scripture.

"I'm reluctant to comment on another person's faith," Buttigieg said in April. "But I would say it is hard to look at this president's actions and believe that they're the actions of somebody who believes in God.”