'We fight on': 2020 Democrats mark Juneteenth

'We fight on': 2020 Democrats mark Juneteenth

Several Democrats running for the 2020 presidential nomination took to Twitter on Wednesday to mark Juneteenth, the celebration commemorating the end of slavery in the U.S. 

Juneteenth this year comes as the House Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Civil Liberties holds a hearing on slavery reparations. Several presidential contenders have endorsed legislation that would form a commission to study the prospect. 

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Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerCastro attack shines spotlight on Biden's age CNN, NY Times to host next Democratic debate in October Poll: College students say Warren won third Democratic debate MORE (D-N.J.), who will testify at Wednesday’s House hearing, introduced the first reparations bill to the Senate since Reconstruction, which would establish a commission to examine the impacts of slavery in the U.S. and recommend ways to compensate the descendants of slaves. 

Sens. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisHarris keeps up 'little dude' attack on Trump after debate The crosshairs of extremism  On The Money: Democratic candidates lay into Trump on trade | China exempts US soybeans, pork from tariff hikes | Congress set to ignore Trump's wall request in stopgap measure MORE (D-Calif.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenYoung insurgents aren't rushing to Kennedy's side in Markey fight Biden's debate performance renews questions of health On The Money: Democratic candidates lay into Trump on trade | China exempts US soybeans, pork from tariff hikes | Congress set to ignore Trump's wall request in stopgap measure MORE (D-Mass.), Bernie SandersBernie SandersYoung insurgents aren't rushing to Kennedy's side in Markey fight Biden's debate performance renews questions of health Saagar Enjeti rips Harris's 'empty promises' MORE (I-Vt.), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandAt debate, Warren and Buttigieg tap idealism of Obama, FDR Trump court pick sparks frustration for refusing to answer questions Klobuchar, Buttigieg find themselves accidentally flying to debate together MORE (D-N.Y.) and Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharOn The Money: Democratic candidates lay into Trump on trade | China exempts US soybeans, pork from tariff hikes | Congress set to ignore Trump's wall request in stopgap measure Overnight Energy: Harris goes after DOJ antitrust probe of automakers over emissions | Trump on energy-efficient light bulbs: 'I always look orange' | Climate change only briefly discussed in third presidential debate CNN, NY Times to host next Democratic debate in October MORE (D-Minn.), all fellow 2020 contenders, have co-sponsored the legislation.

“Celebrating #Juneteenth by remembering those fearless leaders who fought for abolition, while recognizing the enormous work that remains to be done to achieve true freedom from economic inequity, mass incarceration, and racial disparities,” Booker tweeted Wednesday.

“On Juneteenth, we recognize emancipation and honor those who fought and died in the fight to end slavery. Still, the fight for equality and equity is far from over as Black Americans still face injustice — from our justice system to the ballot box. We fight on,” Harris echoed. 

"Juneteenth should be a national holiday," Sanders tweeted, attaching an image saying he was endorsing an effort by a Texas activist to get the federal government to recognize the celebration.

“Juneteenth isn’t just about celebrating the end of slavery in Texas. It’s a necessary reminder that 154 years later, Black Americans still feel the harsh reality that the fight for racial equality in our country is far from over. I’m in that fight all the way,” Warren said.

“On Juneteenth, we celebrate emancipation—but we must also acknowledge the shadow slavery still casts. We can't change our past, but we must keep working toward a more just future: starting with finally studying reparations, ending mass incarceration, and enacting postal banking,” Gillibrand tweeted.

“On Juneteenth, we're celebrating a powerful moment in history. But it's a moment whose promise is not yet realized as we fail to address a legacy of slavery, segregation, and suppression that is alive in this country. The fight for true freedom, justice, and equity must go on,” former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-Texas) said. 

“Today as we celebrate #Juneteenth and reflect upon the end of slavery 154 years ago, we must acknowledge that the fight for racial equality in the United States is not over. We must confront white supremacy in America and continue to push for freedom and justice for all,” Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellYoung insurgents aren't rushing to Kennedy's side in Markey fight The Hill's Campaign Report: Democrats clash over future of party in heated debate 5 takeaways from fiery Democratic debate MORE (D-Calif.) tweeted.

“Today we do more than commemorate the abolition of slavery. We redouble our efforts to fight against racism that still exists in our country, bridge the systemic inequality faced by too many Americans, and keep building that more perfect union. #Juneteenth,” Gov. Steve BullockSteve BullockThe Hill's Campaign Report: Democrats clash over future of party in heated debate The Hill's 12:30 Report: House panel approves impeachment powers Left off debate stage, Bullock all-in on Iowa MORE (D-Mont.) said.

"Slavery is a stain on our founding values of liberty, justice, and equality. On Juneteenth, we celebrate the end of slavery, and we recommit to continuing to become a more perfect union for everyone," Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetThe Hill's 12:30 Report: House panel approves impeachment powers Burden in tonight's debate is on Democratic realists 2020 primary debate guide: Everything you need to know ahead of the September Democratic debate MORE (D-Colo.) tweeted.

"June 19th is an important day in American history - the day of emancipation of hundreds of thousands of African Americans. We yet have a very long way to go. Let our history inform our shared future," entrepreneur Andrew YangAndrew YangOn The Money: Democratic candidates lay into Trump on trade | China exempts US soybeans, pork from tariff hikes | Congress set to ignore Trump's wall request in stopgap measure Saagar Enjeti rips Harris's 'empty promises' Overnight Defense: Afghanistan tops foreign policy issues at Dem debate | Erdogan says he'll discuss missile sale with Trump | US again challenges Beijing's claim to South China Sea MORE said.

"#Juneteenth is a day of celebration — but also a poignant reminder that the fight for justice and equality didn’t end with slavery. More than a century and a half later, we must recommit ourselves to ending systemic racism in all its forms and achieve true equality for everyone," Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleeThe Hill's Campaign Report: Democrats clash over future of party in heated debate 5 takeaways from fiery Democratic debate Left off debate stage, Bullock all-in on Iowa MORE (D-Wash.) tweeted.

"Today, on #Juneteenth, we commemorate the end of slavery in the U.S., as word of emancipation reached Texas. We have a responsibility to continue working towards true equality, and to address the original sin of slavery," former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian CastroJulian CastroYoung insurgents aren't rushing to Kennedy's side in Markey fight Biden says he'll release medical records before primaries Biden's debate performance renews questions of health MORE said.

"Today on #Juneteenth, we celebrate the effective end of slavery in the US. Though the fight for equality and opportunity for all is far from over, on days like today, we must remember to not lose faith in each other and our ability to heal, together," former Gov. John HickenlooperJohn HickenlooperLeft off debate stage, Bullock all-in on Iowa Yang says he would not run as a third-party candidate The Hill's Morning Report - Hurricane Dorian devastates the Bahamas, creeps along Florida coast MORE (D-Colo.) tweeted.

"The Emancipation Proclamation didn't end slavery. The Civil Rights Movement didn't end oppression. This Juneteenth, let's honor the progress made and recommit ourselves to the work we still have to finish. #Juneteenth," New York City Mayor Bill de BlasioBill de BlasioAt debate, Warren and Buttigieg tap idealism of Obama, FDR De Blasio calls out Andrew Yang over Puerto Rico flub at debate The Hill's 12:30 Report: House panel approves impeachment powers MORE said.

"On this day, we recognize the end of slavery in the US. As we commemorate all that African Americans have overcome, let's not forget the challenges many still face. We will continue fighting to end systemic racism in this country, and to achieve true equality for all. #Juneteenth," former Rep. John DelaneyJohn Kevin DelaneyTrump campaign mocks Democratic debate: 'Another informercial for President Trump' The Hill's 12:30 Report: House panel approves impeachment powers Sanders slips in NH, Biden and Warren in statistical dead heat MORE (D-Md.) tweeted.

"On #Juneteenth, we celebrate emancipation while recognizing the injustices that continued after slavery. We must not let progress distract us from today's fight against voter suppression, mass incarceration & the racial wealth gap. We still have work to do to right these wrongs," Rep. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) John RyanThe Hill's 12:30 Report: House panel approves impeachment powers Tim Ryan debuts 'album' on Spotify to pitch 2020 platform 2020 primary debate guide: Everything you need to know ahead of the September Democratic debate MORE (D-Ohio) said.

"#Juneteenth is a celebration of the end of slavery and liberation of black Americans, but it’s also a reminder of the work that lies ahead, the work required to overcome delayed justice, and the need to build a more fair and equitable society," Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) tweeted.

Racial justice has emerged as a central issue in the Democratic presidential primary, with candidates unveiling a slate of policies to rectify racial inequities, including boosting funds to small businesses run by entrepreneurs of color and increasing efforts to reduce maternal mortality rates among black mothers.

Updated at 3:59 p.m.